She’s Not Here Officially Opens TODAY Downtown

New Pacific Asian Cocktail Bar and Kitchen Serving Tropical Drinks and Asian-Inspired Dishes

Photography courtesy of Nicolai McCrary.

She’s Not Here, a Pacific Asian cocktail bar and kitchen from Uchi/ko and 50 Eggs alumni Ben Cachila and Chris Romero, is thrilled to officially open its doors to the public on Wednesday, August 15 in the 2ND Street District. The restaurant features fun, bright, tropical-influenced libations. Expect curious riffs on classic drinks utilizing hibiscus rye, aged rum, applewood-smoked mezcal, roasted coconut, jasmine, toasted almond, cloves, falooda syrup, cardamom, and magrood leaf.

The cocktail program is supported by a surprising and playful menu utilizing vibrant ingredients. Composed of small bites, seasonally focused sushi, cold tastings, and main dishes, the menu is inspired by traditional Asian recipes that are accented with fresh and aromatic elements. 

Highlights from She’s Not Here’s opening cocktail and dinner menu include: 

Cocktails: Hibiscus – Rittenhouse hibiscus rye, tiki bitters, coconut sugar; Sling – gin, aperol, fresh pineapple juice, lime; Smoke – applewood mezcal, plantation pineapple rum, lime, orgeat, toasted almond salt rim; Ginger – Batavia arrack, fresh ginger, honey, lemon; Rose – Aviation gin, grapefruit, falooda syrup, lemon, Peychaud’s; and Matcha- Tito’s vodka, matcha tea, coconut milk, honey syrup. 

Nigiri: Hamachi -yellowtail; Mebachi - big eye tuna; MadaiJapanese sea bream; Gai Lan - Chinese broccoli; and Shanghai Tip – Chinese romaine. A special “Sakana Haka” fish selection will change daily with offerings such as Kinmedai – golden eye snapper; Tennen Aji – wild horse mackerel; Taraba – king crab; and Goba Saba  - blue nose mackerel. 

Temaki: Soft Shell Crab – aioli, cucumber, kaiware sprouts; Cali Butter - clarified ponzu butter, California crab, soy paper; and Ume Shiso – Japanese plum, perilla, cucumber. 

Cold dishes: Marinated Yellowtail – lychee, green apple vinegar, pickled Asian pear; and Tasmanian Ocean Trout - passion fruit, South Pacific fruit relish, crown daisy.

Hot dishes: Pork Adobobraised and fried pork shank, adobo jus, crispy cauliflower, coconut cream; Braised-Fried Korean Chicken with yuzu-pickled Asian pears, summer squash, and toasted chili oil; Galbi Style Pork Ribs – pickled shishito, garlic sweet soy glaze; and Sakana Tempura - crispy cod fillet, apple tentsuyu, pickled apple, togarashi.

The chefs have also been particularly mindful to dietary needs by developing an extended selection of produce-driven sushi items that are both vegan and gluten-free.

Relaxed and refined, the interior evokes a reimagined tropical hotel lobby from the 1920s and is a mash-up of French Art Deco meets island textures and palettes. The exterior is adorned with massive and sultry flora that has been executed entirely with spray cans by local street art legend Mez Data. This createsan ideal setting to spend a pleasant and lazy afternoon or evening sipping on colorful, flowered drinks while laughing a little too loudly with friends.

According to William Jackson, Chief Business Officer and Publisher of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential, “When you want a truly thrilling dining experience in the 2nd Street District of downtown Austin, then you must try She’s Not Here.  From the moment you enter the door, the experience is stellar.  The decor is simple, yet tasteful reminiscent of Palm Springs.  The food and drink programs are refreshing and thrilling, sure to tantalize the eyes as well as the taste buds.  The staff is knowledgeable, very professional.  Our hats off to our server Robert who ROCKED!  We were in a constant state of diner’s euphoria.”

Located downtown at 440 West 2nd Street, Austin, Texas, 78701, She’s Not Here compliments the neighboring venues, restaurants, and The Violet Crown Cinema by providing a lush downtown refuge that serves both food and beverage Sunday – Thursday 5 p.m. – midnight, and Friday and Saturday 5 p.m. – 2 a.m. Expect expanded hours coming soon, which will include grab-and-go bento box lunches and happy hour service.

For more information, visit www.shnaustin.com or follow along on Facebook (/SNHATX) and Instagram (@snhatx).

Real Doctor Tries the Intermittent Fasting Trend and Here’s What Happened

There’s crash dieting, and then there’s intermittent fasting. Crash diets aren’t sustainable and rarely factor in healthy food options. Intermittent fasting on the other hand is gaining attention because people are seeing weight come off, and therefore stay with it. It’s being touted as the go-to way to lose 15, 20 pounds within a month or two. Is it just a popular hashtag or can the weight actually stay off leading millions of people to reach their weight goals? To get clarity, we spoke to Dr. Niket Sonpal who not only is Board Certified in Internal Medicine specializing in Gastroenterology; but lost 6 pounds his first week of intermittent fasting when he decided to do it himself. Here’s what he has to say about intermittent fasting.

What inspired your decision to do intermittent fasting?

I noticed the winter weight became the spring then summer weight and I wanted to take off extra pounds that I noticed had crept on. I was with friends talking about how they lost weight during religious observation and that intermittent fasting was a “thing.” I rolled my eyes. I was skeptical. Then I went online and applied my doctor mind to the concepts I was reading about it and went for it.

There are several ways to go about intermittent fasting. Which way did you do it, when did you start and what was the result? 

This is true. The way I chose, and the way I would imagine most people would try, is the one that calls for 16 hours of fasting with 8 hours of eating time per day. This basically means if your last meal of the day is 8pm you will have your first meal by noon the following day, free to eat until 8pm again. I figured since I sleep most of those hours, it wouldn’t be that tough. The 5-day 2-day option of intermittent fasting, calls for normal eating for 5 days and then strict calorie counting for 2 days (500 calories for women and 600 for men). I didn’t want to be obsessing about calorie counting.

What were the challenges (if any) that you faced when intermittent fasting?

I live across the street from a bagel shop in New York City. I also have delicious New York pizza on every other corner. Cravings and temptation were there for me for sure. When I left my home and smelled those fresh bagels my brain said. “let’s eat.”

Coming at your intermittent fasting as a doctor, what were some things you were thinking about that others must consider too? 

I thought when I would fast. When would be my 8-hour eating period. When we start caloric consumption right when we wake up we do better with weight loss. However, that would mean eating from 7 am until 4pm. This would require a later meal around 3pm. Then I thought, does my lifestyle better allow a 12 noon to 8pm food window?

I also thought about the physiological aspect to what happens to our bodies when we fast intermittently. For one thing, it facilitates weight loss by enhancing hormone function. Insulin levels also lower, plus there’s a rise in noradrenaline. This combination is what helps us to breakdown body fat for energy. While this all reads well on paper there is a lifestyle aspect to it that must be factored in. I’ll add that anyone with a condition should consult with their doctor before going all in on intermittent fasting.

Why do you think it is so difficult for people to fast? What are some of the common symptoms people feel when fasting and what causes them?

When people think of fasting they think of starvation and deprivation. They anticipate they will feel terrible will have a growling stomach, dull headaches, and a bad mood. While these are common symptoms felt at first when fasting, the 16/8 intermittent fasting option allows for food every day. When people see quick results, they stick with it.

What was your diet? What did you cut out and add in? 

I looked at my schedule and my overall daily lifestyle and how food was involved. For people who live very hurried lifestyles, food is typically something that is grabbed fast on the go. When we approach food this way no diet will be sustainable. I realized this would require consistent changes in my behavior. It would also require me to get very mindful about what I was eating during the 8 hours of eating time. I chose to eat what I liked in moderation. So, if two slices of pizza twice per week was the lunchtime norm, I reduced to it to once slice. I still ate pasta just not as often and not as much. I also added in a lot more vegetables, proteins, healthy fats and cut out all fast food and soda. Hey, I’m a doctor, but also a human!

For those thinking about intermittent fasting, how would you advise them to proceed? 

I would explain that at around the 2 to 4-week mark, someone may plateau. When you notice this don’t think this is the most weight you are able to lose. This is normal and if you are also exercising with weight or resistance training you may be building muscle mass. Pay attention to how clothes fit, body fat loss and how weight loss shows beyond the scale. Knowing how over time the body gets used to intermittent fasting and starts to store up all that is eaten, leading to less weight loss, I suggest resetting your body by eating small, healthy meals throughout the day for a week and then resuming the 16/8 intermittent fasting option again.

People may happily think that they can fast and then enjoy a big bowl of pasta or cheeseburger. What kinds of foods should people eat during intermittent fasting?

You can get results without cutting out your favorite foods which means enjoy that burger or pasta, I did! However, you can’t binge on fast food and think you’re going to make any lasting changes. You want to up your vegetable intake. Things like grilled zucchini or eggplant make for great sides to a piece of grilled chicken or steak. Avocados are a good staple for healthy fats and are versatile. There are loads of recipes out there so plan out your food options in advance, so you stick with it.

About the doctor:

Dr. Niket Sonpal is Adjunct Assistant Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, Clinical instructor at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn and on the board of the NY‐ American College of Physicians (NYACP). He is completing his Fellowship in gastroenterology at Lenox and has spoken and presented at over 25 national and regional conferences on his research and is a regular participant in national courses.

Where to Celebrate National Relaxation Day this August 15th

Tomorrow is the perfect day… to relax! Where are you celebrating National Relaxation Day in NYC tomorrow?

As a national holiday that everyone deserves to celebrate, here is a list of the top 5 places to go right in NYC:

  • Premier57, NYC’s 40,000 sq. ft. luxurious spa/water wonderland is the perfect escape this August just a walk away in Midtown. The meditation room, infrared lounge and sleeping room put the ‘relax’ in relaxation lounge.

  • Shibui Spa - From the roof of the 250 year old Japanese farmhouse that adorns the spa’s pool and lounge area to the holistic, nature-driven treatments, everything in the spa is about impressive yet understated beauty.

  • The Spa at Mandarin Oriental - If you’re looking for a particularly lavish retreat, try one of their holistic wellness rituals like the three hour Thai Yoga Journey that uses Thai yoga massage to help you find balance inside and out.

  • Aire Ancient Baths - Stepping into Aire Ancient Baths is like stepping back in time to a classic Roman bathhouse. Lounge like an emperor on heated marble stones or soak in their six candlelit specialty pools.

  • Ohm Spa & Lounge - This cozy spa specializes in targeted massages and skin-loving facials including everything from enzymatic peels to hydrating treatments using pure manuka honey from New Zealand.

We hope you’re able to relax at your choice of the best place to unwind this August 15th and every day.

Are You Ready for the Ice Ball 2018?

Ice Ball 2018

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas’ brightest gem, the Ice Ball Gala, includes cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, seated dinner, auctions and live music in downtown Austin. This annual event allows the organization to raise funds to create life-changing mentoring relationships for children and families in Central Texas.

The 2018 gala will take place at the Fairmont Austin hotel on August 25, 2018.

Visit www.AustinIceBall.org to learn more!

Welcome to the Summer is too Good to Waste Edition of Teen InFluential

Victoria Garcia, Contributing Writer for Teen InFluential

Victoria Garcia, Contributing Writer for Teen InFluential

Sunny days, tan lines, and long weekends at the beach— what could be better? Greetings and welcome to another blazing addition of Teen InFluential. We’re thrilled to share with you the July / August edition of one of the most optimal publications for teens.

As the season of fun in the sun is quickly passing by, you may be wondering— what could I do next? We get it, you want to make your 2018 summer one to remember. Well we’ve got you covered! Inside, you’ll find backyard party ideas sure to make you the cool kid on the block. But wait, long days outside in the blinding sun could take a toll on your eyes. Check out our guide on how to choose the correct sunglasses that will keep you protected and going all summer. Are you college bound?  Are you wondering how you’re going to fit your whole room in a tiny dorm? Check out our tips on how to make your college move smooth and productive while still getting it done in a reasonable amount of time. Whether college for you is near home or hundreds of miles away, there is no escaping the allergy problems that may follow you everywhere. See our guide on what to do for allergies to ensure you stay safe and worry free for your next four years of college.

As you continue to embark on your summer journey and begin to prepare for the school year to come, the team at Teen InFluential wishes you a summer full of festivities, friends, and growth. Thank you for turning the page with us. Now kick back on a floaty, relax in the water, and enjoy the hottest season yet!

Have a great summer,

Victoria Garcia

Contributing Writer for Teen InFluential

Florida Memorial University Awarded Scholarship by Kevin Hart’s “Help From The Hart Charity,” a New $600,000 Scholarship Program

UNCF, KIPP team up with charity to help 18 students attend HBCUs

Following up on his generous $100,000 scholarship gift made through UNCF (the United Negro College Fund) to four deserving college students back in 2015, actor and comedian Kevin Hart has joined forces with UNCF and KIPP (Knowledge Is Power Program) to help 18 more KIPP students earn a college degree including Laibela Faraba, a freshman at Florida Memorial University.

Through a new UNCF scholarship program launched in partnership with Kevin Hart’s “Help From The Hart Charity” and KIPP Public Schools, the $600,000 scholarship will provide funding to support KIPP students from eight different cities, attending 11 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).

I would like to express my gratitude to Mr. Hart and the UNCF for helping advance Florida Memorial University’s agenda along with the other HBCUs,” said Dr. Jaffus Hardrick, Interim President, Florida Memorial University.

“Education and knowledge are powerful,” said Hart. “I just wanted to do my part in providing opportunities for our future leaders, especially from my Philly hometown, and show support for HBCUs. This is just the beginning; trust me when I tell you there are a lot more kids who want to go to college who don’t have the money to make it happen.”

UNCF is the largest provider of college scholarships for students of color in the U.S., awarding more than $100 million in college scholarships annually to deserving students. The 18 “Help From The Hart Charity Scholarship” recipients have been selected based on their academic and personal accomplishments and may receive substantive renewable awards based on need.

“The ‘Help From The Hart Charity Scholarship’ will not only support students, but will also demonstrate support for HBCUs,” said UNCF CEO and President Michael L. Lomax. “Research shows that HBCUs matter, and that HBCU students are having a positive college experience, but they also have an unmet financial need. Together, Kevin and KIPP have made an investment that will have a significant impact. We can’t thank them enough for their support, and we want to congratulate these 18 students for keeping their eyes on their goal of a college education.”

Hart’s gift to fund this new scholarship program puts him in line with many other renowned celebrities who have supported UNCF over the years. “Giving back to build better futures is the name of the game, and we hope that others like Kevin will understand why educational investments are so important, especially now, and step up to help more deserving students,” said Lomax.

“Nothing brings me greater joy than to see the hard work of these 18 KIPP students recognized by Kevin Hart and UNCF through this generous scholarship program,” said John Fisher, chair of the KIPP Foundation Board of Directors. “Michael Lomax has been a longtime KIPP supporter and friend and a tireless champion for young people. We are incredibly grateful to both UNCF and Kevin Hart for their partnership and support to help our students thrive in college and achieve their dreams.”

Lomax added, “Over the last decade, UNCF has been building a relationship with the KIPP public school network, and we are so excited that KIPP’s board of directors and their Chairman John Fisher are behind this outstanding new venture. There are more than 1,300 KIPPsters currently enrolled at HBCUs, and together, we are bringing resources and shining a spotlight on these students who are doing all they can to get a college education. This unique partnership will help UNCF continue to bridge the gap from high school success to college achievement and enables UNCF to help more students get to and through college.” 

About UNCF: UNCF (United Negro College Fund) is the nation’s largest and most effective minority education organization. To serve youth, the community and the nation, UNCF supports students’ education and development through scholarships and other programs, strengthens its 37 member colleges and universities, and advocates for the importance of minority education and college readiness. UNCF institutions and other historically black colleges and universities are highly effective, awarding nearly 20 percent of African American baccalaureate degrees. UNCF awards more than $100 million in scholarships annually and administers more than 400 programs, including scholarship, internship and fellowship, mentoring, summer enrichment, and curriculum and faculty development programs. Today, UNCF supports more than 60,000 students at more than 1,100 colleges and universities across the country. Its logo features the UNCF torch of leadership in education and its widely recognized motto, “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.”® Learn more at UNCF.org, or for continuous updates and news, follow UNCF on Twitter at @UNCF.

About KIPP Public Schools: KIPP, the Knowledge Is Power Program, is a national network of 224 public charter schools dedicated to preparing students in educationally underserved communities for success in college and life. KIPP schools are part of the free public school system and enrollment is open to all students. Started in 1994 as a middle school program, KIPP has since expanded to enroll 96,000.

Off to School and Into a New Routine

The fall season is met with many transitions, from cooler weather to time changes to more time spent indoors. Among these transitions is the immediate shift from packing beach bags for a day in the sun to packing suitcases to head back to campus for a new semester. As every student’s routine faces an overhaul this time of year, it is important to bear in mind any health needs that may come into play while away from home.

“When my patients are off to college – be it for the very first time, or as a returning student – I always remind them to keep health-related to-do’s top-of-mind, just as they would think about ordering textbooks or finding libraries on campus,” says OB/GYN Dr. Lakeisha Richardson, a paid consultant of Allergan, the maker of Lo Loestrin® Fe (norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol tablets, ethinyl estradiol tablets and ferrous fumarate tablets). Please see Important Risk Information, including Boxed Warning, for Lo Loestrin Fe below.

To prepare for the upcoming school year, Dr. Richardson shares the following tips a student may not find in her campus welcome pack:

  1. A new city means more than just distance: If you’re adjusting to a new time zone and you take oral contraception, always factor in the time difference to make sure you are taking your pill at the same time every day. You can also have your prescription transferred to a local pharmacy. Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to fill a prescription for a three-month supply.
  2. Take more than just class notes: Purchase a planner to help stay on top of assignments while away from home and set reminders to make doctors’ appointments while at home. Stickers are also a discreet tool you can use to keep track of your period cycle each month.
  3. Finding your people means more than just making new friends: Seek out all resources that will set you up for a healthy semester. Find your campus health clinic and ask to be connected to a healthcare provider in the area, stay active at your university’s on-site fitness center and get coursework support through teaching assistants who are there to answer questions throughout the semester.
  4. Packing supplies means more than just lunch: Your class schedule may not allow you to go back to your dorm or apartment during the day. An easy way to stay prepared is to add a cosmetic pouch or extra pencil case to your bag to stash feminine hygiene products and your birth control pill pack.

To find additional resources about available birth control options, visitKnowYourBirthControl.com , and speak to your healthcare provider to determine the method that is right for you.

What is Lo Loestrin Fe?

Lo Loestrin Fe is a prescription birth control pill used for the prevention of pregnancy. If you are moderately obese, discuss with your healthcare provider whether Lo Loestrin Fe is appropriate for you.

 

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

WARNING TO WOMEN WHO SMOKEDo not use Lo Loestrin Fe if you smoke cigarettes and are over 35 years old. Smoking increases your risk of serious cardiovascular side effects (heart and blood vessel problems) from birth control pills, including death from heart attack, blood clots, or stroke. This risk increases with age and the number of cigarettes you smoke.

 

Who should not take Lo Loestrin Fe?

Do not use Lo Loestrin Fe if you have or have had blood clots, history of heart attack or stroke, high blood pressure that medicine cannot control, breast cancer or any cancer that is sensitive to female hormones, liver disease or liver tumors, unexplained bleeding from the vagina, if you are or may be pregnant, or if you take Hepatitis C drugs containing ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir, with or without dasabuvir, as this may increase levels of liver enzymes in the blood.

What else should I know about taking Lo Loestrin Fe?

Treatment with Lo Loestrin Fe should be stopped if you have a blood clot, and at least 4 weeks before and through 2 weeks after major surgery. You should not take Lo Loestrin Fe any earlier than 4 weeks after having a baby, or if you are breastfeeding. If you experience yellowing of the skin or eyes due to problems with your liver, you should stop taking Lo Loestrin Fe. If you are pre-diabetic or diabetic, your doctor should monitor you while using Lo Loestrin Fe. Your doctor should evaluate you if you have any significant change in headaches or irregular menstrual bleeding. 

What are the most serious risks of taking Lo Loestrin Fe?

Lo Loestrin Fe increases the risk of serious conditions including blood clots, stroke, and heart attack. These can be life-threatening or lead to permanent disability. 

What are the possible side effects of Lo Loestrin Fe?

The most common side effects reported by women taking Lo Loestrin Fe in a study were nausea/vomiting, headache, spotting or bleeding between menstrual periods, painful menstruation, weight change, breast tenderness, acne, abdominal pain, anxiety, and depression.

Birth control pills do not protect you against any sexually transmitted disease, including HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. 

Please see the fullPrescribing Information, including Boxed Warning, andPatient Information which are also available atloloestrin.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Lo Loestrin Fe

Tips for Packing Healthy School Lunches on a Budget

Dr. Yum serves up tips on how to pack affordable healthy lunches this school year

Back to school means back to lunch preparation for parents around the country. It’s a challenge that many parents take on, but often struggle to keep healthy. While it’s easy to toss in convenient snacks, it’s not going to do much in the way of keeping their little bodies healthy and developing well. One pediatrician wants parents to know that sending kids to school with healthy lunches each day doesn’t have to be difficult or expensive. In fact, she’s on a mission to help teach parents how to pack healthy school lunches on a budget.

“School lunches may not seem significant in a child’s life, but when you add up that they are eating them five days per week it’s quite a lot of their calorie consumption,” says Dr. Nimali Fernando, a Fredericksburg, Virginia-based pediatrician who founded The Doctor Yum Project. “Teaching them healthy lunch habits from a young age will give them the tools to build lifelong healthy habits.”

Of concern for many pediatricians is the fact that most children are simply not eating enough healthy foods to begin with. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a report earlier this year which stated that only 12 percent of adults meet the daily recommended fruit intake, and only 9 percent reach the daily vegetable intake. They went on to say that most U.S. children do not meet national recommendations for daily fruit and vegetable servings. Add to it the fact they report that 14 percent of preschool aged children are considered obese, and it’s a recipe for health disaster.

Here are tips from Dr. Yum for packing healthy school lunches on a budget:

  • Plan lunches for the week. Every weekend, sit down and make a list of what lunches you will make throughout the week. Dr. Yum’s Menu Planner can help you plan lunches, dinners, breakfasts and snacks and then gives you a shopping list for the week that is even sorted by department.
  • Buy in bulk. Skip buying individually packaged items like snacks. They are often much more expensive that way. Buy items in bulk, such as at Costco, and use reusable containers to put the items in. Keep it healthy by opting for things like dried fruit, trail mix, unsweetened applesauce, etc.
  • Use leftovers. Plan your dinner meals so that you can make extra and then put some aside for lunch the next day. The Dr. Yum Menu Planner is terrific for this too!
  • Make from scratch. When we buy items, such as muffins, premade at the store, they often have ingredients in them that we would never find in our pantry. Take it old school by going back to making your own items from scratch. Preparing a batch of healthy muffins, for example, and then putting them in the freezer will help you save money and have healthy options on hand at all times.
  • Skip the sugary drinks. Buying sugary drinks is not only expensive, but it puts too much sugar into your child’s diet. Opt for sending them with a reusable container filled with water or unsweetened tea.
  • Take a twist on old favorites. Most kids like a traditional PBJ, but you can add some twists by making peanut butter and sliced banana sandwiches, using a whole wheat tortilla, or putting peanut butter and jelly into a whole wheat tortilla and grilling it like a quesadilla. Each variation makes it a bit different, but very few different ingredients are used, keeping it easy and affordable.
  • Think smoothies. Packing a smoothie like Dr. Yum’s Green Dragon Smoothie once a week is a great way to get kids nutrition, serve them something they like, and make lunch preparation easy. Keep bags of frozen fruits and veggies (like spinach and kale) on hand and whip together a smoothie to put in their thermos. Smoothies are not just for breakfast!

“Get your kids involved in helping to make healthy lunches this year, which will teach them healthy habits and make them more likely to actually eat what you pack together” added Heidi DiEugenio, director of the Doctor Yum Project. “Once you decide you want to serve healthy and affordable lunches, you just need to stick with the commitment and make it happen. It will become a healthy habit for the whole family.” 

Quick, healthy recipe from the Doctor Yum Project website:  Rainbow Veggie Pinwheels

8 whole wheat tortilla wraps

1 cup hummus

1 cup red bell pepper, thinly cut strips

1 cup grated carrots

1 cup yellow bell pepper, thinly cut strips

1 cup fresh spinach, thinly cut

1 cup purple cabbage, shredded

METHOD 

Spread about two tablespoons of hummus on each tortilla, leaving a one-inch border on all sides. Line up a thin layer of sliced vegetables across the hummus. Roll up the tortilla tightly. Cut the roll crosswise into four or five pinwheels and serve. These can easily be made ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator, ready for a party, snack, or packed lunch! 

Dr. Fernando created The Doctor Yum Project, an organization with the mission of transforming the lives of families and communities by providing an understanding of the connection between food and overall health, as well as empowering them with the tools to live a healthy life. The project offers healthy cooking classes, child nutrition classes, cooking camps for kids, hands-on cooking instruction for families, first foods classes, a teaching garden, and online tools to help families make healthier meals. They also offer a preschool nutrition program, with 40 classrooms and almost 600 participating preschoolers.

Dr. Fernando, otherwise known as Dr. Yum, is a board-certified pediatrician. She is also the co-author of the book “Raising a Healthy, Happy Eater: A Parent’s Handbook” (The Experiment, October 2015). To learn more, visit the site at: www.doctoryum.org.

About The Doctor Yum Project

Founded by Dr. Nimali Fernando, The Doctor Yum Project is a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to transforming the lives of families and communities by providing an understanding of the connection between food and overall health, as well as empowering them with the tools to live a healthy life. They offer a variety of community programs to help with those efforts. They are located in Fredericksburg, Virginia, and feature an instructional kitchen and teaching garden for holding classes. To learn more, visit the site at: www.doctoryum.org.

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fruits and Vegetables. https://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/downloads/fruits-vegetables/2018/2018-fruit-vegetable-report-508.pdf.

Crime Museum Offers Visitors Rare Look Inside Surveillance Van, Joins Other Overlooked Gems at Alcatraz East

Former undercover surveillance van joins museum displays

Alcatraz East Building

There’s a new artifact on display at Alcatraz East, but since its focus is on undercover work it might be hard to spot. The crime museum in Pigeon Forge is giving visitors a look inside the workings of law enforcement surveillance, with a van formerly used by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and a Georgia police department. Visitors can see how agents on a stakeout spend time in the cramped quarters of a van which is not nearly as glamorous as made out to be on television.

“It’s not often that something like this comes along, that was actually used by federal and local law enforcement on criminal cases,” says Rachael Penman, director of artifacts and exhibits. “And it has not been stripped of its equipment, giving visitors a real insider look at how it all works.”

Surprising to most people is the close quarters for the agents to work. In fact, the van doesn’t even allow the undercover officers enough room to stand up straight. It also offers little privacy using the toilet inside. Officers could monitor suspects from four different camera angles and would often spend hours in the tight space during a stakeout.

According to Lilburn, Georgia Police Chief Bruce Hedley, the van was used for several years in active criminal investigations, including drug crimes and burglary stake outs, such as in a neighborhood where there was a rash of car break-ins. From the Getaway Cars Gallery in the museum, guests will be able to see the camera perspective of a detective on a stakeout inside the van, viewing in real time as visitors come and go from the museum.

“I am very proud that the public can look at a very important piece of law enforcement equipment that we used to keep our community safe,” says Chief Hedley.

The surveillance van is not the only artifact in the museum that hides interesting details unseen from the public. The car belonging to the bank robber John Dillinger was involved in a shootout, and although the car was restored by a later owner, they kept one of the bullets visible, but only from inside of the car.

In the over twenty galleries in Alcatraz East, it can be easy to miss some of the most fascinating details of the hundreds of artifacts on view. For instance, the initial “ZT” carved in the brass railgun in the Pirates Gallery or the handwritten notes on the side of the Unabomber’s scale about its calibration. In the Mob Gallery hidden behind Mickey Cohen’s custom suit is his shirt, embroidered with his name. On the end of the sniper rifle used by the University of Texas Sniper are small numbers on a piece of tape, settings for the scope. There are other examples of objects that were designed to be hidden, like the dye pack inside a stack of $20 bills to ward against bank robberies.

Also going on display this week are the winners of Alcatraz East’s Graffiti Art Contest on June 2nd. First, second, and third place winners can now be seen on display, that is, if you’re paying attention. “The exhibit is a bit off the normal museum tour,” says Penman, “a reflection of where you often are when you see graffiti in real life, in alleys, abandon lots, by train tracks and other neglected spaces. We thought it was fitting to maximize our limited space and beautify our own “alleys.”

The museum is always adding to their collection and has a star-studded panel of experts who make up the Advisory Board, including those in law enforcement, collectors, a medical examiner, crime scene investigators, and others. The board includes Jim Willett, a retired prison warden, Anthony Rivera, a combat veteran and Navy SEAL chief, and Judge Belvin Perry, Jr., who is best known for the Casey Anthony trial. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit: www.alcatrazeast.com.

About Alcatraz East

Alcatraz East is the most arresting crime museum in the United States. Guests of all ages can encounter a unique journey into the history of American crime, crime solving, and our justice system. Through interactive exhibits and original artifacts, Alcatraz East is an entertaining and educational experience for all ages – so much fun it’s a crime! This family attraction is located at the entrance of The Island, located at 2757 Parkway, Pigeon Forge, TN. General admission tickets are $14.95 for children, $24.95 for adults. Group ticket sales are available. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., with the last ticket sold 60 minutes before closing. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit: www.alcatrazeast.com.

School Bus Safety 101

For millions of school-age children in the United States, each day begins – and ends – with a bus ride. While the school bus is the safest way to travel to and from school, according to the National Association of Pupil Transportation (NAPT), it’s important for parents to teach their children how to stay safe in and around the school bus as obstructed views, distracted drivers and more can put kids at risk.

These tips from the experts at NAPT and the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) provide parents with some additional measures to take and lessons to teach to increase safety going to and from the bus, and even during the ride.

Before the Bus Arrives

  • Ensure backpacks are packed securely so papers and other items don’t scatter as the bus approaches.
  • Create a morning routine that puts kids at the bus stop five minutes before the scheduled pickup time. This helps avoid a last-minute rush, when safety lessons are easily forgotten, and ensures kids are safely in place for boarding.
  • Encourage children to wear bright, contrasting colors so they can be seen easier by drivers.
  • Walk young children to the bus stop or encourage kids to walk in groups. There is safety in numbers; groups are easier for drivers to see.
  • If kids must cross a street, driveway or alley, remind them to stop and look both ways before crossing.
  • Verify the bus stop location offers good visibility for the bus driver; if changes are needed, talk with nearby homeowners or school district officials to implement changes. Never let kids wait in a house or car, where the driver may miss seeing them approach the bus.
  • Remind children that the bus stop is not a playground. Balls or other toys could roll into the street and horseplay can result in someone falling into the path of oncoming traffic.
  • Instruct children to stay at least three steps away from the road and allow the bus to come to a complete stop before approaching it.

On the Bus Ride

  • When boarding the bus, items can get bumped and dropped. Caution children that before picking anything up, they should talk to the driver and follow instructions to safely retrieve their possessions.
  • Teach safe riding habits: stay seated with head, hands and feet inside at all times; keep bags and books out of the aisle and remain seated until the bus stops moving.
  • Instruct children to never throw things on the bus or out the windows and to never play with or block emergency exits.
  • Remind kids that just like when riding in a car, loud noises are off limits so they don’t distract the driver. That includes cellphones and other electronic devices; instruct children to put them on mute or use headphones.

Leaving the Bus

  • Remind children to look before stepping off the bus. If they must cross the street, teach them to do so in front of the bus by taking five big steps (approximately 10 feet) away from the front of the bus, looking up and waiting for the driver to signal that it is safe.
  • For parents who meet their kids at the bus, remember that in their excitement kids may dart across the street. Eliminate the risk by waiting on the side of the street where kids exit the bus.
  • Make the bus ride part of your daily “how was school?” discussion. Encourage kids to talk about the things they see and hear on the bus so you can discuss appropriate behaviors and, if necessary, report any concerns to school administrators. As bullying is prevalent and buses are no exception, ask your child to tell you about any bullying they observe, whether against another child or themselves, and talk about how to shut down bully behaviors.

For more information and additional school bus safety tips, visit BetterOurBuses.com.

An Alternate Form of Transportation

Many school districts are moving away from diesel buses in favor of buses powered by an alternate fuel, like propane, which offers numerous benefits for school districts and their students.

In fact, school buses powered by propane transport approximately 928,000 students to and from school every day at more than 840 public and private school districts in 48 states, according to a vehicle registration report compiled by PERC using IHS Polk new vehicle registration data.

“There’s a lot to like about propane school buses for community stakeholders and school officials, and school districts across the nation continue to take notice,” said Michael Taylor, PERC director of autogas business development. “Compared to other fuels, propane school buses are quieter and offer reduced emissions. Plus, they cost less for the district to operate, so schools can put more money back into the classroom where it helps students most.”

Safety

Among the numerous safety advantages propane school buses provide, engines powered by propane are noticeably quieter than diesel engines, which can help ensure a safe ride. Plus, just like all buses, propane buses are crash tested to ensure they meet U.S. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards for side and rear impact. In addition, an automatic shut-off valve prevents the flow of fuel to the engine when it’s not running, even if the ignition is turned on.

Cleanliness

The World Health Organization and the Environmental Protection Agency have identified diesel engine exhaust as a carcinogen, which can cause short- and long-term health effects. With the emergence of alternative fuels like propane, which provides a clean emissions profile compared with diesel and gasoline buses, there is decreased risk of exposing young passengers to harmful particulate matter that can be found in the exhaust in older diesel buses, which can escalate breathing-related issues and aggravate asthma.

Cost-Effectiveness

Financially, propane buses provide school districts with the lowest total cost-of-ownership compared to other fuel types, according to PERC. Even as gas prices continue to fluctuate across the country, propane consistently costs less per gallon than diesel and gasoline, by as much as 50 percent, which saves districts significant money on fuel costs. They also require less maintenance over the lifetime of the vehicle, saving additional money on upkeep. Savings on transportation can help keep more money in the classroom helping students learn.

Start a discussion with your children’s school district about exploring a switch from diesel buses to cleaner alternatives by first downloading resources including fact sheets, videos, a toolkit and more at BetterOurBuses.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Propane Education & Research Council