How to Plan for Traveling with Kids

Families that travel with kids typically know tablets and other gadgets and activities can make the journey easier, and vacation rentals can make the stay more relaxing and affordable.

These tips from the experts at Vrbo can help make it easier to hit the road with kids, whether it’s exploring exciting new places, visiting relatives or relaxing during an annual trip to the beach.

Start packing early. Begin a week or two before the trip by helping kids write a list of what to take. It can help build excitement and avoid last-minute fusses over how many toys and favorite pajamas go in the suitcase. If there’s a long journey ahead, consider temporarily lifting limits on tablet screen time and bring along a couple travel surprises like coloring books.

Don’t overpack. Since many vacation rentals come with washers and dryers there’s no need to pack two outfits per day per child plus backups in case of spills. If the place your group is staying has a laundry room, pack enough clothing for half the trip then throw a load in the wash after a few days. Pack some detergent pods in a plastic bag in case it’s not provided.

Pack snacks. Travel often messes with mealtimes, but you can keep hunger (and the crankiness that comes with it) at bay with portable snacks. Pack a selection of treats to tide over hungry bellies until you’re able to stop for a complete meal. Include a few items typically reserved for special occasions so you have the added benefit of excitement to distract from an unfamiliar eating schedule.

Bring favorite toys. A sentimental and familiar item from home can help a child feel more secure in new surroundings. In fact, a survey from Vrbo revealed just how popular teddy travel is, with more than half of those surveyed (55%) citing stuffed animals as the most important thing their child brings on vacation.

However, 69% of those surveyed said their child has left a toy or stuffed animal behind while away from home. In the event a toy does get left behind, look into resources like Vrbo’s Teddy Bear Service. Any traveler staying in one of the company’s vacation rental homes can call 1-774-VRBOTDY or email TeddyBearHotline@vrbo.com to report a lost teddy bear or other item of sentimental value, and the company will help track it down and expedite its return home.

Plan for nap time. Whether you’re racing to put miles behind you or scurrying to catch a connecting flight, it’s easy to get off track and miss nap time completely. If you’re likely to miss a nap, try to at least plan for some quiet time to let kids rest and rejuvenate. Also remember that travel can be tiring for kids who have outgrown naps on a regular basis and encourage them to grab some shut-eye before signs of exhaustion emerge.

Find more traveling tips and information at vrbo.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Vrbo

Welcome Words to the Awesome Readers of Teen InFluential’s July – August 2019 Edition

William Jackson, MBA, Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

William Jackson, MBA, Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

Greetings Teen InFluential Family & Friends:

Welcome to our July / August edition!

We hope your summer is great and you’re taking advantage of many exciting ways to keep cool!  As you enjoy your break from school, we hope you still find unique and exciting ways to continue learning, growing, getting better.  After all, learning is fun!  We hope you’re stopping by Teen InFluential regularly to keep up with all things “Dedicated to the Art of Living Well”.

By now, many of you have decided on which college you’ll be attending in the fall or what career path you’ll be pursing.  In this edition, we have a few articles aimed at helping you make meaningful education and long-term career decisions.

Of course, we have some cool articles about fashion & style, food, health & wellness, sports, technology, and philanthropy.  Our goal is to keep you well-rounded, stimulated, and energized.  You’re the future and we want you to continuing being and prepared to give your very best.

Thank you always for hanging with us!  Have a great summer and we can’t wait to learn about all the great things you’ll do over the course of the next few months.

With excitement,

William Jackson, MBA, GQ Insider, 2018 Folio: 100 Honoree

Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

New Children’s Book Offers Highly Effective Anxiety Coping Strategies

Reena B. Patel, a licensed educational psychologist and author, has a new book that will help parents, educators, and children with combating anxiety 

April 2nd is International Children’s Book Day, making it a great day to consider the impact that some books can have on today’s youth. One author, Reena B. Patel, is on a mission to help children learn how to identify and address stress and anxiety. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the country, affecting 18 percent of the adult population and 25 percent of children between the ages of 13 and 18. Many children under the age of 13 also experience anxiety disorders, making it an issue that impacts the population as a whole. 

“Starting at a young age, children are plagued with worry and anxiety, yet we are not always good at providing them with the coping skills that will help them overcome it,” explains Reena B. Patel, a parenting expert, licensed educational psychologist, and author. “This is often because parents and educators are not sure what coping skills work, so they can pass that information on to the children in their lives.”

That’s where Patel aims to change things. Her new book, “Winnie & Her Worries,” explores the area of worry and anxiety. While the book was written for kids ages 3-10, the information and coping strategies offered are effective for all ages dealing with anxiety. The book provides examples of common stressful situations, which are often brought on by living in a competitive world that has high demands and unrealistic expectations. The book also provides coping strategies that can be used to help address the fear and anxiety.

Coping strategies are thoughts and behaviors that people can use to help them get through emotionally difficult times, such as when they have anxiety, which is the fear of the unknown. Patel’s book aims to help parents, educators, coaches, and caretakers be able to help them identify anxiety in a concrete way and learn the coping strategies they can use to become more confident and less fearful. 

“Too many people experience anxiety on a regular basis,” added Patel. “The good news is that there are numerous things that people can do to address the situation. It’s just a matter of someone showing them what works, which is exactly what my new book does.”

In the January 2017 issue of the journal Annals of Psychiatry and Mental Health, researchers reported that chronic stress leads to anxiety and depression. Their report noted that stress is often neglected in day to day life when it could play a detrimental role in one’s mental health. They advise that social support, explanatory styles, locus of control, personality types, and coping skills can be significant when dealing with stress.

Winnie & Her Worries” offers healthy habits for the whole family. The book was written to target young kids, because it is harder to change maladaptive habits as teens and young adults if they do not have coping skills. Those who read the book will find that they will be able to better identify anxiety triggers, as well as gain valuable information regarding preventative tools and coping strategies for anxiety and stress. The tools are aimed at helping those who use them to feel more confident, comfortable, and able to engage in their everyday routine with ease and no worries or stress. This book has been created using professional techniques that are easy to implement, even amidst busy lives, making it an important book to have in every classroom and home. 

Patel is the founder of AutiZm& More, and as a licensed educational psychologist and guidance counselor, she helps children and their families with the use of positive behavior support strategies across home, school, and community settings. She does workshops around California, where she provides this information to health professionals, families, and educators. She is also the author of two children’s books that teach compassion and kindness, called “My Friend Max: A Story About a Friend with Autism,” and “Winnie & Her Worries,” both available on Amazon. To learn more or order the books, visit the website at www.reenabpatel.com.

About Reena B. Patel
Based in the San Diego area, Reena B. Patel (LEP, BCBA) is a renowned parenting expert, guidance counselor, licensed educational psychologist, and board-certified behavior analyst. For more than 20 years, Patel has had the privilege of working with families and children, supporting all aspects of education and positive wellness. She works extensively with developing children as well as children with exceptional needs, supporting their academic, behavioral and social development.  She was recently nominated for San Diego Magazine’s “Woman of the Year.” To learn more about her books and services, visit the website at www.reenabpatel.com, and to get more parenting tips, follow her on Instagram@reenabpatel.

Sources:

Annals of Psychiatry and Mental Health. Chronic stress leads to anxiety and depressionhttps://www.jscimedcentral.com/Psychiatry/psychiatry-5-1091.pdf.

Anxiety and Depression Association of America.Facts & Statistics. https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics.

Welcome to the March / April 2019 Edition of Teen InFluential

William T. Jackson, Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

William T. Jackson, Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

Every morning, I wake up at 4:45. I spend around an hour answering emails from all ten of my accounts, check my phones for any messages from writers, graphic designers, and family, wipe away the eye matter that tends to form after only five hours of sleep, and get dressed for a full day of business.

I’m William Jackson and I’m the Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential, the multi-award winning internationally read E-zines, Dedicated to the Art of Living Well.

With the assistance of a very talented and collaborative team, we work hard to publish exciting E-zines sure to inform, insight, inspire, and influence.  It’s our hope you’re finding something entertaining and useful in each edition.  Of course, we welcome your feedback so feel free to let us know how we can improve.  We enjoy hearing from you as it keeps us inspired and motivated to keep doing what we enjoy doing.

Nicole Glenn, our Editor of Teen InFluential and her awesome team, are doing a great job.  Though they are busy with all things that college life brings, family responsibilities, and such, they always carve out a huge chunk of their busy schedules to put together amazing editions of Teen InFluential.  We certainly couldn’t do it without their talent and collaboration so I’m always quick to say THANK YOU!

We hope you’ll join us and plan on Being so Chic! this spring season.  It’s the right thing to do!

Thank you, our amazing readers, for your constant support.  Be sure to subscribe to Teen InFluential at www.influential-magazine.com and connect with us on Facebook (@Teen InFluential) and Twitter (@TeenInFluential).

Sincerely,

William Jackson, MBA, GQ Insider, 2018 Folio: 100 Honoree

Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

What Every Parent Needs to Know About Kids and Screen Time

 Written by Reena B. Patel, Contributing Writer for InFluential Magazine 

Reena B. Patel, a licensed educational psychologist and author, offers up the facts on how screen time may be harming our children and what to do about it

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), in 1970 children didn’t start regularly watching TV until they were four years old. Today, they report that children begin interacting with digital media at four months old. One look around and it’s easy to see that many children have their own cell phone, tablet, television, or other type of screen that is occupying a lot of their time and attention. The problem with this is with all that screen time there are numerous ways that research shows it may be harming kids. From the smallest of toddlers who are glued to watching tablets and televisions, to teens who are using their devices almost constantly, it’s prompted concerns that every parent should be aware of.

“There is no denying that technology plays a major role in our lives today, but when it comes to our children we need to be aware of the challenges it can cause,” explains Reena B. Patel, a parenting expert, licensed educational psychologist, and author. “Children’s cognition skills are still developing, so it’s imperative that we take that into account when it comes to their screen usage time.”

In the same report, the AAP reports that 75 percent of children ages 0-8 have access to a mobile device, and that most one and two-year-olds are using a mobile device on a daily basis. This trend continues through every age group. The average 8-10 year old is spending around eight hours per day on various forms of media, and older children are spending more than 11 hours per day. A Pew Research Center report shows that 24 percent of teens go online “almost constantly,” and 92 percent of them report using their mobile devices on a daily basis.

As many would suspect, all of this screen time coming from phones, tablets, and televisions, raises some questions about how healthy it is. In a separate AAP statement, they report that the cognitive impact of the media depends on the child ages, the kind of programming or games they are playing, and social context of viewing. They find that there are both negative and positive outcomes.

When it comes to adolescents, screen time can have a negative impact. The research shows that adolescents who spend more time on electronic communication and screens (such as social media, texting, and gaming) and less time on non-screen activities have a lower psychological well-being. In addition, excessive media use has been associated with obesity, lack of sleep, aggression, sleep problems, and other behavioral problems.

Most parents realize that children also engage in learning activities and even have homework assignments they need to use screens for. They are a part of life and a part of their learning experience, as well as their entertainment one. Rather than sheltering kids from social media and screens, parents should strive for teaching them healthier ways to use them, and how to maintain a balance. With screens here to stay, it’s important that parents take steps to help keep their child’s time spent on them in check. Here are some tips to do just that:

  • It’s recommended that children under the age of two not be exposed to screen time at all. For children over the age of two, it’s recommended that the screen time be kept to one to two hours per day at the most.
  • Discuss the screen time challenges with your children, especially when they are adolescents and teens, so they understand the concerns. Ask your child what are the pros and cons of unlimited or excessive use of devices. Devise a plan for using screens, which limits the amount of time they can be used each day. When children are involved with developing the plan, they are more likely to follow the rules they helped create.
  • Encourage kids to create a balance between screen time and non-screen time. It’s important that kids of all ages engage in physical and social activities that do not involve the usage of screens. Encourage them to have real-life relationships, rather than their friendships being all online or done through electronics.
  • Create rules that will help give them boundaries about when they can use their devices. For example, no devices at meals, and no phones allowed in their bedrooms overnight.
  • Find non-screen activities that the whole family can engage in. This will help them create bonds and learn healthy social behaviors.
  • Use positive parenting techniques when working with kids to help teach them the limits of screen and social media time.
  • Be the example that you want them to follow. From young children to teens, they are watching what parents do when it comes to screen time. Parents who overuse screen time are setting that same example for their children. Having healthy screen habits will teach children to do the same.
  • Parents should be familiar with all the apps and devices their children use. They should have access to the social media apps as well. Ex: Instagram can be created and monitored from a parents account and note on social media pages that it is “parent monitored.” Also, become familiar with Internet safety, including setting parental controls, and how to avoid giving too much personal information online.

“This is an issue that we can’t ignore and hope that it gets better,” added Patel. “We have to take the time to address it, no matter how old our kids are. The technology may be newer to us, but it’s always been a part of their lives, it will continue to be part of their everyday lives and they need to know how to use it in a healthy and constructive manner. They need parental guidance to get there.”

Patel is the founder of AutiZm & More, and as a licensed educational psychologist and guidance counselor, she helps children and their families with the use of positive behavior support strategies across home, school, and in community settings. She does workshops around California, where she provides this information to health professionals, families, and educators. She is also the author of two children’s books that teach compassion and kindness, called “My Friend Max: A Story About a Friend with Autism,” and “Winnie & Her Worries,” both available on Amazon. To learn more, visit the website at www.reenabpatel.com.

Reena B. Patel

Reena B. Patel

About Reena B. Patel

Based in the San Diego area, Reena B. Patel (LEP, BCBA) is a renowned parenting expert, guidance counselor, licensed educational psychologist, and board certified behavior analyst. For more than 20 years, Patel has had the privilege of working with families and children supporting all aspects of education and positive wellness. She works extensively with developing children as well as children with exceptional needs, supporting their academic, behavioral and social development.  She was recently nominated for San Diego Magazine’s “Woman of the Year.” To learn more about her books and services, visit the website at www.reenabpatel.com and to get more parenting tips follow her on Instagram @reenabpatel.

Sources:

American Academy of Pediatrics. Children and adolescents and digital media. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/138/5/e20162593.

American Academy of Pediatrics. Decreases in psychological well-being among American adolescents after 2012 and links to screen time during the rise of smartphone technologyhttps://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Femo0000403.

American Academy of Pediatrics. Managing Media. https://www.healthychildren.org/English/news/Pages/Managing-Media-We-Need-a-Plan.aspx.

Pew Research Center. Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015. http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/09/teens-social-media-technology-2015/.

One Tip for Choosing a Safer Video Game for Kids

While many parents and others shopping for young people know to look out for violence and sexual content in video games, they may not be aware of something else found in many popular games that is raising serious public health concerns.

Research shows that exposure to images of tobacco — its use still the leading cause of preventable death and disease in the U.S. — can influence young people to start smoking. In fact, 44 percent of adolescents who start smoking do so because of smoking images they see in movies. Tobacco use in video games is likely to promote youth smoking in similar ways and may even pose additional concerns since video games are more active and intense experiences. Some games even include storylines or elements where tobacco use benefits a player.

Despite the risk, tobacco content in video games is not a well-known issue. Here are some important things to be aware of so you can avoid games with tobacco content.

Many youth- and teen-rated games include tobacco.

Just because a game is rated appropriate for youth and teens does not mean it is free of tobacco imagery. While a methodical review of games on the U.S. market has yet to be conducted, it is clear from past research that tobacco use is frequently depicted in video games geared toward young people.

For example, between 1994 and 2011, 60 out of 78 large video game publishers included tobacco imagery in at least one, and often more, of their games rated appropriate for youth. A 2012 paper on the prevalence of tobacco in games found a significant increase in tobacco content in games rated for young adolescents since 2005.

More recently, Truth Initiative, the national public health organization behind the tobacco public education campaign truth, conducted a partial review of 2016 releases from top publishers and found more than a dozen video games with tobacco imagery, including at least five rated “Teen.”

Warnings and content descriptors are not always reliable.

Video game content descriptors often fail to mention tobacco use, making it difficult for parents to use them to monitor for tobacco imagery.

A 2015 survey by the University of California, San Francisco, confirmed tobacco content in 42 percent of the video games that participants reported playing; however, only 8 percent of these games had tobacco warnings from the Entertainment Software Rating Board, the gaming industry’s self-regulatory organization that rates video games and apps.

In its report, “Played: Smoking and Video Games,” Truth Initiative called on the ESRB to consistently identify and disclose if any game contains tobacco use or tobacco references. The organization is also urging game developers and publishers to stop including tobacco use and tobacco images in their games, particularly those marketed to or played by youth, regardless of their ESRB rating. Research suggests that pressure on movie producers has succeeded in decreasing tobacco imagery in youth-rated movies, and the same efforts should be used to influence game developers and publishers.

Even as national smoking rates have declined to record lows, smoking continues to be portrayed positively on screens. Glamorizing and re-normalizing smoking, and making it appear “cool,” could threaten the progress the U.S. has made in decreasing tobacco use, which kills 1,300 Americans every day.

For more on the topic of tobacco in video games, visit truthinitiative.org. (BPT)

How Sleep Deprivation Affects Student Performance

Written by Sarah Westgreen, Contributing Writer for InFluential Magazine

We all need sleep to function well in daily life, and students are no exception. Although teens and young adults often get by on very little sleep due to lifestyle and sleep cycle changes, it is not without consequence.

Sleep deprivation can have a profound effect on cognition, learning, and performance at school. But getting enough sleep can enhance memory consolidation and concentration.

Why Students Can’t Sleep Well

When puberty hits, adolescents experience a change in their circadian rhythm[1]. This shift pushes sleep time back, even when their schedule requires an earlier bedtime.

Students who previously felt sleepy around 8 or 9 p.m. may no longer feel tired until 10 or 11 p.m. Their sleep schedule is delayed by two hours and some teens may feel like they’re suffering from insomnia until they adjust to the new schedule.

Although they may be going to sleep later, adolescents still need about nine hours of sleep each night. But they often have to wake up early for school, and just don’t have enough time to sleep if they go to bed later.

This shift is made more difficult when teens consume caffeine or nicotine, or stay up late on social media or doing homework. Often, teens attempt to catch up on weekday sleep by sleeping in late on the weekends. Unfortunately, this only exacerbates the situation by further throwing off their circadian rhythm, making it more difficult to get to bed and wake up on time during the week.

What Sleep Deprivation Does to Students

Reduced sleep is associated with poorer school performance[2]. Extensive studies[3] indicate a high prevalence of poor sleep quality and less than optimal amounts of sleep. Getting suboptimal amounts of sleep can affect how well students can learn, and may adversely affect performance at school.

When students have insufficient sleep that results in sleepiness, irritability, distractibility, and lack of motivation, they can suffer from impaired acquisition and retrieval of information. Insufficient sleep jeopardizes the memory formation process. However, adequate sleep can enhance the consolidation of memory and resistance to interference.

Struggling to sleep well and focus on schoolwork can lead to degradation in grades. Typically, students who are struggling or failing in school with C, D, or F grades report that they sleep about 25 minutes less and go to bed about 40 minutes later than students with A and B grades[4].

Additionally, students with worse grades have greater weekend sleep schedule delays than those with better grades. Overall, students who get less sleep during the week with a large weekend bedtime delay show increased daytime sleepiness, depressive mood, and sleep/wake behavior problems more than students who sleep longer than eight hours and 15 minutes during the week with less than an hour of weekend delay.

How Students Can Sleep Better

Adolescence can be a tough time for sleep as students adjust to a new sleep schedule, demands on their time, and changing bodies. But students who sleep well can perform well, so it’s important to focus on getting adequate sleep as much as possible.

  • Schedule life around sleep. Students may have to wake up early for school, so it’s important to consider sleep needs (typically about nine hours each night) and count backwards from when it’s time to leave for school. Make sure family activities, homework, and other commitments are wrapped up well before it’s time to go to bed.
  • Plan naps during the day. When there’s just not enough time between feeling sleepy and waking up for school, students can’t get the full amount of rest they need at night. Although naps aren’t an ideal solution, they can help bridge the gap and help students feel refreshed throughout the day. Students can plan short 20 minute naps in the late morning, lunchtime, or early afternoon. However, it’s a good idea to avoid naps longer than 30 minutes, or naps in the late afternoon or evening, as these can interfere with nighttime sleep.
  • Rest in a healthy sleep environment. Where students sleep can influence the quality and quantity of their sleep. Students should choose an appropriate mattress and bedding, and make sure their room is dark, quiet, and cool. Avoid falling asleep with a laptop or mobile device in bed, as blue light emitted by electronic devices can increase alertness and make it difficult to doze off.
  • Practice good sleep hygiene. Good sleep hygiene means avoiding major sleep pitfalls. Consuming caffeine, nicotine, or alcohol can interfere with sleep, especially at night. Although exercise is generally helpful for sleep, it can leave teens feeling too alert if done late at night, so it’s best to avoid exercise in the hours just before sleep. Screen time can increase alertness and confuse the circadian rhythm, so it’s important to stop screen time at least an hour before bed.
  • Maintain a sleep schedule and bedtime routine. Humans thrive on predictability, especially with sleep. With a regular sleep schedule, the body learns a regular bedtime and wake time, which makes it easier to stick to that schedule the more you keep it up. A regular bedtime routine works the same way, sending signals that it’s time to start feeling sleepy once you go through the activities of your bedtime routine each night. Your routine can be as simple as plugging in your phone, brushing your teeth, and reading a chapter of a book before turning the lights out.

About Sara Westgreen

Sara Westgreen is a researcher for the sleep science hub Tuck.com. She sleeps on a king size bed in Texas, where she defends her territory against cats all night. A mother of three, she enjoys beer, board games, and getting as much sleep as she can get her hands on.

[1] “Sleep and Teens,” UCLA Health. http://sleepcenter.ucla.edu/sleep-and-teens.

[2]Mary Carskadon, “Sleep’s effects on cognition and learning in adolescence,” Progress in Brain Research. 190:137-43. (2011).

[3] Howard Taras, William Potts-Datema, “Sleep and Student Performance at School,” Journal of School Health. Volume 75, Issue 7. (2009).

[4] Amy R. Wolfson, Mary A. Carskadon, “Sleep Schedules and Daytime Functioning in Adolescents,” Child Development. Volume 69, Issue 4. (2008).

Happy 3rd Anniversary Teen InFluential!

It’s Our 3rd Third Anniversary! 

William Jackson, MBA,  Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

William Jackson, MBA, Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

As you might imagine, Teen InFluential receives correspondence from readers every month. Sometimes it comes by e-mail and sometimes through social media. Many of the messages begin with “I look forward to reading Teen InFluential every edition” and then there’s usually a recommendation for improvement.

We appreciate all our readers, all of us on the team do. We believe when you’re taking the time to communicate, even when to tell us how we can possibly do better, you’re showing you care.

We’re thrilled to have a huge audience of smart people who live all over the world, with various tastes and lifestyles, and interests.  With each story we publish, our goal is to positively impact all of you. Of course, reaching this goal will always be a work in progress, but we can certainly hope, can’t we?

On the month of our 3rd Anniversary, I, and on behalf of the entire team, would like to say “thank you.” Thank you to our longtime subscribers, occasional readers, and everybody in between. Thank you for understanding that Teen InFluential is “Dedicated to the Art of Living Well”, and we hope we help you do the same.

We’ll continue to be here for you, hopefully to make every day of your life your best one yet, just as you make our days much brighter.  You see, without you we’d be nothing more than a bunch of words on paper.

Sincerely,

William Jackson

Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

It’s Our 7th Anniversary!

William Jackson, Found & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

William Jackson, Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential

On the one hand, it feels like I’ve been doing this for a lifetime, while on the other, I find myself wondering “Where did the years go?” It’s been a year of excitement, highs and lows, long work days and restless nights, but I wouldn’t trade it for anything else.

This past year has taught me so many useful lessons, and one that really stands out is just how important it is for individuals to be patient, long-suffering, and kind toward others; without judgement.  In a culture where freedom of speech is widely encouraged, many seem to have lost sight on the importance of having something of positive and encouraging to say, tempered with applying the “Golden Rule”.  As a reminder, the “Golden Rule” admonishes us to “do unto others as you would have them do unto you”.  Of course, the lack of applying the “Golden Rule” is almost always to our detriment.

In previous Publisher’s Notes, I shared my own struggle with trying to ensure I live a well-balanced life and making such a priority. Although, I still have room for improvement, I’ve been making slow but steady progress. I recently began adding the practice of yoga to my regular health & wellness routine, something I never would have imagined in a thousand years. But thankfully, it’s doing wonders for me. I feel calmer, am resting better, and my days are less hectic.

It’s with this newfound sense of balance and calm I wish to collaborate with you as we begin our seventh year. On that note, I’m thrilled to welcome you to our Seventh Anniversary Edition!  One of our Exclusive Interviews is with Hanna Jaffe Bosdet.  The well-known Philanthropist, human rights activist, speaker, and author opens up about her new acting role in NETFLIX’s first Mexican reality series Made in Mexico, and what’s she’s doing to raise awareness of important topics such as human rights, immigrants, refugees, peace, and the importance of education.  Being that this also our Style Edition, of course we had to bring you many topics related to style and its impact as we strive to live well.

I invite you to feast your eyes on this stunning Seventh Anniversary Edition and enjoy reading the rest of the amazing features we have for you in this Edition.  May this Edition inform and inspire you to continue living your best life.

From my very being, I thank you for being a dedicated reader. Seven thrilling years would not be possible without you.  I’m so grateful to and inspired by the entire InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, andTeen InFluential teams, who work tirelessly to bring you our award-winning publications. I’m truly excited about the future of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential, and I believe the best is yet to come.

Fondly and with Great Enthusiasm,

William Jackson

Founder & Chief Business Officer of InFluential Magazine, Spanish InFluential, and Teen InFluential