5 Tips for 1st Foods for Babies

Ask any parent what he or she remembers most about a child’s first year and you’re likely to hear quite a bit about sleep schedules. However, a baby’s eating schedule is just as important as his or her sleep.

While feeding a baby seems like it should be simple, for some new parents it can be nerve-wracking and lead to plenty of questions, such as: “Should I breastfeed or bottle feed?” “How much should my baby eat?” “When should I start baby food?” “What should my baby’s first foods be?”

To help navigate first-year feeding, consider these tips from the experts at KinderCare.

Let babies eat as much as they need, when they need it.

Be prepared to feed your baby soon after he or she shows signs of hunger, like rooting; sucking on hands, toes, clothes or toys; or reaching for food. Let your baby tell you when he or she is full – like turning away, falling asleep or losing interest in eating. This helps your baby learn to eat when hungry and stop when full, even if it means not eating everything you offer.

Choose a feeding style that meets you and your baby’s needs.

Whether you breastfeed or use a bottle, the important thing is your baby is fed. If you breastfeed, it’s a good idea to express some milk now and again so your baby will take a bottle if someone else needs to feed him or her.

Understand when it’s time to start baby food.

While most babies are introduced to solid foods around 6 months of age, it depends on their individual development. Generally, if your baby can sit up on his or her own, has good neck and head control and shows interest – like reaching for food during mealtimes – it may be appropriate to try solid food.

Focus on exploration.

It’s important to provide your baby with a variety of foods free from added sugars, sodium and artificial ingredients, and let him or her explore rather than focusing on how much is eaten.

“Focus on introducing veggies, proteins, grains and fruit – in that order,” said Courtney Hines, KinderCare’s nutritionist. “Babies are naturally inclined to prefer sweet things so save fruit for last so your baby is more inclined to try other flavors.”

Make the transition gradual and fun.

Hines recommends gradually exposing babies to a wide variety of whole, unprocessed foods with varying flavors and textures, and talking with your baby about the taste, feel and look of the foods he or she is trying. Starting with soft foods like mashed potatoes, avocadoes, sweet potatoes, cooked rice and bananas can give you an idea of what your child can handle.

It’s easy to focus on baby food stages, but transitioning to solid foods will take place over time, making it important to continue offering your baby a bottle before mealtimes, in addition to solid food. Once your baby reaches his or her first birthday, talk with your family doctor about transitioning from breast milk or formula to unflavored, whole-fat milk.

It’s important to remember that every baby develops at his or her own pace. Talk with your child’s doctor about the right pace for your baby, and find more tips to navigate your child’s major milestones at kindercare.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
KinderCare

Now’s the Time to Teach At-Home Nutrition

With a lot of parents facing the challenge of keeping housebound kids happy and healthy, this is the perfect time to teach kids the basics of nutrition and eating right.

Consider these simple suggestions from Melanie Marcus, MA, RD, health and nutrition communications manager for Dole Food Company.

  • Healthy Snack Time Taste Tests – Sometimes it feels like kids can snack all day long on easy-to-grab crackers, chips or cookies. Next time they reach into the snack pantry, try incorporating a taste test or food critic activity to encourage something different and more nutritious.
  • Purposeful Playtime – Many households have a play kitchen or some kind of play food. Use this as an opportunity to act out how to create a healthy kitchen with activities like making salad, setting the table, peeling bananas and washing dishes. This can help young children become more independent, learn what to expect and grow into little helpers at family mealtime.
  • Sensory Activity – One idea that can work for school and at home is making a sensory box. Simply place a fruit or two inside a tissue box and have children put their hands inside then try to guess which fruit it is by feeling it.
  • Recipes for Fun – If you’re preparing a meal, it could be a good time to teach children of reading age how to review a recipe. Evaluating ingredients to learn how food transforms from raw to cooked or how a dish is created can help kids learn kitchen skills. For example, try this fun, fruity recipe for Kids with Almond Toast.
  • Food Groups Focus – Get kids involved in making dinner by setting a rule that each food group must be represented. Give them a warmup activity by asking which food groups are found in family favorites like chicken soup, lasagna or meatloaf. Asking kids to guess which ingredients are used in these dishes and identifying which food group each ingredient belongs to can help them understand dietary balance. Find more at-home tips in the free, downloadable Healthy Eating Toolkit from the nonprofit organization Action for Healthy Kids.
  • Reading Time – From food labels to children’s books to cookbooks, there are plenty of reading materials to choose from that reinforce healthy eating habits. Exposing children to fruits and vegetables outside the kitchen is a subtle way to show that nutritious ingredients are part of everyday life.
  • Explain the Bathroom Routine – Make sure to wash hands and explain that this is a way of washing away germs to stay healthy. Also explain why brushing teeth is important by reminding children that food can get stuck in teeth and cause cavities.

Find more kid-friendly recipe ideas at dole.com plus nutritional tips, free printables and other healthy fun on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and Instagram.

“Kids” with Almond Toast

Total time: 10 minutes

Servings: 4

  • 4          slices whole-grain bread
  • 6          tablespoons unsalted almond butter
  • 2          teaspoons honey (optional)
  • 1          DOLE®  Banana, peeled
  • 2          Dole Strawberries, trimmed and halved
  • 4          chunks (1 1/2 inches) fresh Dole Tropical Gold Pineapple
  • 2          Dole Blackberries
  • 2          teaspoons toasted flaxseed (optional)
  1. Toast bread slices. Spread with almond butter and drizzle with honey, if desired.
  2. To make “kids”: Cut eight slices and 32 matchsticks from banana. Arrange one strawberry half and one pineapple chunk on two slices toast; arrange remaining strawberry halves and blackberries on  remaining slices. Place one banana slice “head” at top of each piece of fruit and arrange four banana matchsticks around each “kid” for arms and legs. Sprinkle flaxseed along bottom edges of toast under kids’ feet, if desired. (Family Features)

Photo courtesy of Getty Images (mother and daughter)

SOURCE:
Dole

Safety in the Sky

What to know about emergency air ambulance transportation

For many types of medical emergencies, time is a critical factor. The faster a patient receives critical care, the greater the chances for a positive outcome, including a full recovery. However, for people living in remote areas and those who enjoy spending leisure time off the beaten path, time and help aren’t always readily available.

Emergency air medical services can play a vital role in transporting patients who have experienced a medical episode such as a stroke, heart attack, burn- or trauma-related accident including motor vehicle accidents or workplace injuries. In these severe circumstances, patients can benefit from emergency air medical services’ significantly reduced transport times, specialized medical training and advanced equipment.

With the increased closure of rural hospitals, these transports can help patients receive the care they need. Understanding how emergency air medical services work can provide an advantage if a crisis requiring specialized transportation is experienced.

The Decision to Use an Emergency Air Ambulance

Emergency air ambulances are resources typically reserved for times when a patient is facing a life-, limb- or eyesight-threatening emergency and it is in the person’s best interest to receive expedited medical care. A qualified situation typically involves the risk of serious or permanent damage to a patient’s (or unborn child’s) health or bodily function.

If the medical situation meets any of these criteria and the 911 dispatcher determines the patient would benefit from emergency ground or air medical transport, he or she may proactively dispatch an air ambulance along with a ground ambulance. Similarly, when assessing a patient who is critically ill or injured, a first responder or other authorized care professional on the scene will determine the closest and fastest options for getting to advanced medical care. If the condition is particularly serious, air transportation may be the most viable option.

In other situations, physicians or authorized health care professionals operating under strict protocols may make the decision to request an emergency air transport. An example would be when a patient urgently needs a higher level of care and is transported from a community hospital to a larger, better equipped facility such as a trauma center. In fact, these types of interfacility transfers of some of the sickest or most gravely ill patients make up the majority of emergency air ambulance transports.

Payment Options and Insurance Denials

Emergency air medical service payments can vary a great deal. In severe situations, patients cannot be denied access to air transport based on ability to pay. In fact, under the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act, air ambulances are required to deploy (barring severe weather, maintenance issues or actively transporting another patient) and agree to take flights without any knowledge of the patient’s ability to pay. Any type of insurance that may cover emergency air medical transport services, including health, auto, medical and liability, may be a source of payment. Additionally, for those covered through Medicare Part B, a co-pay and deductible may be all a patient is responsible for paying.

However, insurance companies deny payment for roughly 60% of these emergency transports, claiming they are medically unnecessary. Some air medical service providers, like Global Medical Response, employ a staff of highly trained Patient Advocates that work with patients to appeal these denials on their behalf. They work tirelessly to make sure insurance companies fulfill their responsibility to pay so patients are not left with unexpected bills because of surprise insurance denials, even if it takes months or years to resolve a denied claim. Ultimately, 90% of those denials are overturned after numerous appeals.

In the event insurance still will not pay the claim in full or the patient doesn’t have insurance of any kind, the air medical service provider will work with the patient to find a solution that meets his or her unique financial needs to resolve any remaining balance.

Emergency Air Ambulance Memberships

A membership with an emergency air ambulance provider or group of providers, like AirMedCare Network, guarantees no out-of-pocket costs if transported by the provider covered under a membership program. Memberships typically require a minimal monthly or annual fee. In some instances, corporations purchase memberships to cover employees who work in remote areas or drive through large swaths of rural America.

Other benefits are often unique to the individual providers and can include memberships that are valid across a provider’s full network, allowing for coverage while traveling. In addition, household memberships are available to cover people under one roof as well as undergraduate students. Becoming a member is also a way to support the health care needs of local communities since it helps providers operate in rural areas where having a quick response time to critical medical situations can save lives.

Find more information about emergency air and ground transportation services and membership programs at globalmedicalresponse.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Global Medical Response

Good-for-You Sweet Treats

While eating healthy and enjoying sweets seldom go hand-in-hand, choosing the right combination of nutritious ingredients can allow for guilt-free indulgences that shirks conventional dieting wisdom. In fact, some eating plans take it a step further by actually encouraging eating big in the evening when you’re naturally hungriest to help achieve your weight loss goals.

For example, “Always Eat After 7 PM,” written by Joel Marion, CISSN, NSCA-CPT, five-time best-selling e-book author and co-founder of the e-commerce supplement company BioTrust Nutrition, debunks popular diet myths and offers an easy-to-follow diet that accelerates fat-burning and allows you to indulge in your most intense cravings by eating the majority of your calories at night. The outlined plan features a 14-day “acceleration phase” designed for rapid results, a “main phase” when you’ll learn which fat-burning foods to eat to achieve your weight loss goals and a “lifestyle phase” to keep the weight off for good.

Conventional wisdom dictates that it’s best to avoid carbs, eat an early dinner and never eat immediately before bed. However, Marion debunks the myths underlying traditional dieting with a simple, highly effective weight loss program allowing readers to enjoy social dinners without restriction, satisfy nighttime hunger with fat-burning sweet and salty pre-bedtime snacks and indulge cravings with strategically timed cheat meals.

With straightforward food lists, easy-to-follow meal plans and recipes for each phase, this can be a simpler, more enjoyable way to lose weight without feeling restricted. Taken directly from the book, these recipes for No Bake Salted Caramel Bars, Cherry Garcia Ice Cream and Fruit Tarts can satisfy that sweet tooth before heading to bed.

Learn more about the diet and book at joelmarion.com.

Editor’s Note: the website link will be active March 16.

 

Fruit Tarts

Recipe courtesy of “Always Eat After 7 PM”

Prep time: 40 minutes

Cook time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Servings: 20

Custard:

  • 8          egg yolks
  • 1          cup raw honey
  • 1          tablespoon coconut flour
  • 3          cans (13 2/3 ounces each) full-fat coconut milk
  • 1          teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4       teaspoon lemon zest

Sugar Cookie Crust:

  • 1/2       cup coconut oil, plus additional for greasing
  • 1/2       cup palm shortening
  • 1          cup coconut palm sugar
  • 1          teaspoon baking soda
  • 1          teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1/4       teaspoon salt
  • 3          egg yolks
  • 1⁄2       teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1          cup blanched almond flour
  • 1⁄4       cup coconut flour
  • 2          tablespoons arrowroot starch

Toppings:

  • 2          kiwis, peeled and sliced
  • 1          mango, peeled, pitted and sliced into 1/2-inch strips
  • 1/2       cup raspberries
  • 1/2       cup blackberries
  • 1/2       cup blueberries
  • 1/2       cup red grapes
  • 1          cup strawberries, thinly sliced
  • fresh mint leaves, for garnish
  1. To make custard: In saucepan, whisk egg yolks and honey until smooth. Mix in coconut flour.
  2. In medium saucepan over medium heat, combine coconut milk, vanilla extract and lemon zest; bring to boil then remove from heat.
  3. Pour hot milk mixture into egg yolk mixture, stirring while pouring. Over low heat, simmer 5 minutes, stirring constantly.
  4. Remove from heat and let cool, continuing to stir occasionally. Once cooled to room temperature, pour into individual custard cups. Chill in refrigerator 30 minutes, or until serving.
  5. To make crust: Heat oven to 350° F. Line bottom of pie pan with parchment paper and grease with coconut oil.
  6. In large mixing bowl using electric mixer on high, beat coconut oil and palm shortening 30 seconds. Add coconut palm sugar, baking soda, cream of tartar and salt; beat until combined, scraping sides of bowl occasionally. Beat in egg yolks and vanilla until combined. Beat in almond flour, coconut flour and starch. Chill dough in refrigerator 15 minutes.
  7. Press chilled cookie dough into bottom of pie pan and 2 inches up sides. Bake 12 minutes, or until crust is golden and browned on top and edges. Remove from oven and cool 10 minutes. Place cooled crust in refrigerator 30 minutes or overnight before assembling.
  8. To assemble fruit tarts: Spread custard over chilled crust. Decorate top in circular pattern with kiwis, mango strips, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, grapes and strawberries.
  9. Before serving, chill at least 30 minutes or freeze 1 hour to help keep toppings in place.
  10. Remove from freezer and set out at room temperature 20 minutes before slicing. Garnish with mint leaves.

Nutritional information per serving: 192 calories; 14 g fat; 16 g carbohydrates; 61 mg sodium; 2 g fiber; 1 g protein; 9 g sugar.

Cherry Garcia Ice Cream

Recipe courtesy of “Always Eat After 7 PM”

Prep time: 10 minutes

Servings: 4

  • 1/4       cup fresh Bing cherries, pitted and halved
  • 1/4       cup stevia-sweetened dark chocolate bar, chopped
  • 3          overripe frozen bananas, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/4       cup unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1 pinch sea salt
  1. Chill cherries and dark chocolate.
  2. In food processor, pulse frozen bananas, milk and salt until smooth, creamy consistency of soft serve is achieved. Stir in cherries and chocolate. Serve immediately or place in freezer-safe container and freeze until serving.

Nutritional information per serving: 165 calories; 7 g fat; 27 g carbohydrates; 134 mg sodium; 6 g fiber; 2 protein; 12 g sugar.

No Bake Salted Caramel Bars

Recipe courtesy of “Always Eat After 7 PM”

Prep time: 30 minutes

Cook time: 40 minutes

Servings: 30

Cookie Layer:

  • 2 1/2    cups raw pecans
  • 8          pitted dates, soaked in hot water 10 minutes then drained
  • 2          tablespoons blanched almond flour
  • 1          teaspoon coconut flour
  • 1/4       teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4       cup granular zero-calorie, natural sweetener
  • 3          tablespoons coconut oil, melted

Caramel Layer:

  • 1/2       cup coconut palm sugar
  • 1/2       cup granular zero-calorie, natural sweetener
  • 2          tablespoons full-fat coconut milk
  • 2          tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1          pinch sea salt
  • 1          tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2       teaspoon baking soda

Chocolate Layer:

  • 2          cups stevia-sweetened chocolate chips
  • 2          tablespoons coconut oil
  • coconut oil
  • 1/3       cup dry roasted macadamia nuts, chopped
  • coarse sea salt
  1. To make cookie layer: Place large skillet over medium heat. Spread pecans over skillet and toast, stirring often, 8-10 minutes until golden. Remove from heat.
  2. Transfer toasted pecans to food processor and pulse until fine. Add dates, almond flour, coconut flour, sea salt, sweetener and coconut oil; pulse until dough forms.
  3. To make caramel layer: In skillet over medium heat, combine coconut palm sugar, sweetener, coconut milk, coconut oil, sea salt and vanilla extract; bring to boil. Once boiling, decrease heat to low and cook 5 minutes, stirring often.
  4. Remove skillet from heat; whisk in baking soda. Return pan to low heat and cook 2 minutes, stirring often.
  5. Remove caramel from heat and let cool and thicken 5 minutes.
  6. To make chocolate layer: In double boiler, melt chocolate chips and coconut oil. Stir until mixture is smooth then remove from heat.
  7. To assemble salted caramel bars: Line bottom and sides of 9-by-9-inch baking pan with parchment paper, leaving some hanging over sides. Lightly rub parchment paper with coconut oil.
  8. Press cookie dough into bottom of pan to create even layer. Place in freezer 5 minutes to harden.
  9. Pour caramel over cookie layer and spread to coat evenly. Place in freezer 5 minutes. Pour chocolate over caramel and spread to cover evenly. Sprinkle with macadamia nuts and coarse salt. Place in freezer 10 minutes until chocolate sets.
  10. Use overhanging parchment paper to ease set mixture out of pan. Transfer to cutting board and slice into bite-size bars.

Nutritional information per serving: 180 calories; 15 g fat; 15 g carbohydrates; 56 mg sodium; 4 g fiber; 2 g protein; 4 g sugar. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Promote A Book

Start Fresh This Spring With These Tips From Sleepletics

~ A Good Night’s Sleep is More Important Than Ever ~

With spring right around the corner, everyone is searching for a fresh start.

Whether you’re gearing up to move in with your significant other or focusing on more individualized goals with spring cleaning, the experts at Sleepletics®, the online retailer of Celliant® Performance Sheets and Comforters understand how important it is to put a new spring in your step this season. That’s why they’ve compiled a list of scientifically backed tips to help you spring forward refreshed and ready for anything instead of cursing the time change.

Out with the Old, In with the New.

Spring is a great time to clean out your closet. But your wardrobe isn’t the only thing that needs a refreshing makeover. With minimalism gaining momentum as the trend of the new decade, it’s safe to say you probably can throw out some of your older items. After all, do you really need every pillow and blanket you’ve owned since college — especially if you’re moving in with your partner for the first time and combining years of belongings into one home?

Whether you’re cleaning out the same apartment you’ve lived in forever or planning to move in with someone, save yourself some sanity and take inventory of what you have and need moving forward.

The same goes with your bedding. If you’re still holding on to the first set of sheets you got at the bargain store, it may be time to purge. According to NBC News, most sheets need to be replaced after two years. As you’re paring down and evaluating your items during your spring cleaning, maybe it’s time to replace the old with some top-quality products that you know will last longer than average.

Try sheets that are created to enhance your overall wellness rather than just covering your bed. Celliant Performance Sheets and Comforters are scientifically designed to convert body heat into infrared energy and return it to your body in a natural and safe way, increasing blood flow to your muscles and improving local circulation. Add in the fact that they’re wrinkle-resistant unlike the 100% cotton ones you’ve been balling up in your closet, and you’ve got a solid plan for killing your spring cleaning goals already. Plus, with the amazing neutral color selection in Chalk, Blue, Tan, and Light Grey that comes in the coordinating diamond-quilted comforters too, there’s surely a palette you and your partner will agree on for a fresh look in your new home.

It All Starts with Sleep

Nothing puts a pep in your step quite like a solid night of rest, especially when there is so much on your to-do list between organizing, work, and even enjoying the warming weather outdoors.  Sleep is vital, not only for you as an individual, but for your relationship as well. While many studies have confirmed that sleep is good for your health and overall productivity, a 2013 study by the Department of Psychiatry, University of California in San Francisco found that “sleep quality moderates the relationships between amygdala reactivity, negative affect, and perceived stress” – aka, you’ll probably overact and be irritable to the people you see day-to-day if you’re not getting decent sleep. Definitely not the thing you need when taking your relationship to the next level with moving in together.

But it doesn’t have to be months before you adjust to your new home life dynamic. Here are some things you and your partner can do to help keep sleep time sacred.

  • Keep it positive. Avoid heated conversations before bed and make a habit of talking about the good rather than complaining. A study by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found that women collectively reported better sleep days when they had fewer negative interactions with their partners specifically.
  • Keep it dark. According to the National Sleep Foundation, avoiding excess light during nighttime is essential for quality Zzzs. Turn off all screens and invest in some blackout curtains to maintain the atmosphere you need.
  • Keep it comfy. In a survey commissioned by the National Sleep Foundation, 85 percent of participants claimed comfortable sheets and bedding were a large factor in the quality of their sleep with 73 percent going as far as believing sheets and bedding played a large role in romance. Along with being an FDA-determined general wellness product and medical device, Celliant sheets and comforters are designed for comfort. Soft, breathable and silky-smooth, they’re made from premium long-staple cotton and Celliant yarns in a luxurious sateen weave. You’ll not only improve your sleep and overall wellness, you’ll be improving the mood of your bedroom, too.

Spring time can bring a lot of change, whether you’re cleaning out your closet or taking the next big step in your relationship and moving in together. But the one thing you can be confident in is changing your bedding: Celliant sheets will bring your nighttime experience to a whole new level and the sleek design of the down alternative medium-weight comforter, which is supercharged with Celliant in the casing and fill, will complete your room’s fresh new look. With quality, restorative sleep as your focus, you’ll be able to face anything in this new season.

For more information and to purchase Celliant Performance Sheets and Comforters, visit: www.sleepletics.com.  Sheets start at $114.99, and the matching diamond-quilted comforters start at $199.99. Follow us on Instagram @sleepletics and like us on Facebook: @sleepletics.

More about Celliant: Celliant is the industry’s most established and clinically tested infrared textile technology.  Over the past 15 years, Celliant has been evaluated in nine clinical trials conducted by the University of California, Irvine, the University of Calgary and other prominent institutions. In June 2017, the FDA determined that Celliant products are medical devices as defined in section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and are general wellness products. 

5 Tips to Managing Life in Midst of the Coronavirus Outbreak

Unfortunately, the coronavirus strain is already being categorized as “an epidemic of panic,” despite the fact, that the risk of contracting this contingent remains low compared to the flu we continuously battle.

This perspective, however, has thrown the world into a state of chaos and paralysis as if it was already the pandemic and going to destroy us.

So then how do we go through our day and live life fully with joy and peace? Health encompasses the mind, body and spirit as these five tips address toward managing life fully.

The only constant is change. The unknown of the coronavirus brings our sense of uncertainty to the surface. Although, uncertainty is all there is outside of the moment, the human brain tends to veer off to the negative anyway. As emphasized by psychologist and author Rick Hanson, “Our brains are wired to scout for the bad stuff” and fixate on the threat.” (skillpath.com>blog>positive-fight-natural-tendency-focus-negative).

Then when the negativity is added, comes the fear. We go into survivor mode and we are done. It’s hardly possible to remember that ‘new and quick’ spread does not equate virulence. It simply implies that the sooner we address the sooner the unknown becomes known.  So. reframing our negative tendency to the positive aspects, can bring quick relief of the panic.

Seek to quiet the mind by embracing mindfulness. Research supports the mind, body, spirit theory here as states, “Mindfulness can also help reduce the risk of relapse from depression, while also helping with anxiety disorders like PTSD. Mindfulness not only help build the immune system, but it can also help improve our neural processing in as little as a 10-to 15-minute session.” (positivepsychology.com/mindfulness-brain-research-neuroscience) Again, fear is a human instinct for survival and surfaces to warn of potential harm. Rarely is there a person who experiences no fear at all. Anxiety and fear tend to be much larger in our mind than in reality. A regular practice of mindfulness trains the mind to focus on the reality in the moment and offers protection form the fears and hysteria of the unknown. 

Do all that you can do to be healthy period. Go back to the basics of good hygiene. As we are taught, the primary way viruses are transmitted person-to-person through body fluids, like saliva and mucus. The answer is simple, thorough wash your hands. Its important to get you annual wellness checkup, appropriate vaccines, and personal health plan. The theories support, “physical activity may help flush bacteria out of the lungs and airways. This may reduce our chance of getting a cold, flu. Or other illness…Some stress increases the chance of illness. Lowe stress hormones may protect against illness.” (medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm)

Power of intuition –‘the whisperings from within.’ I remember when the anthrax scare hit our nation, watching a newsfeed the advice of a Fireman Captain. He shared how he had a gas mask at work yet had a family at home who didn’t have gas masks. He shared the greatest gift against the poison was to check in with your intuition and follow it. If you are standing in line to go into a building and your inner voice says ‘Don’t, then get out of the line and do not enter.’ His advice resonated with me. Our intuition to is the voice of our higher self and encompasses the intelligence that reminds us we know more than we know we know.

A great example of building your skills of listening to your intuition is the philosophy of HeartMath Institute, “Heart intelligence is the flow of intuitive awareness, understanding and inner guidance we experience when the mind and emotions are brought into coherent alignment with the heart. It can be activated through self-initiated practice. The more coherent we are and the more we pay attention to this deeper intuitive inner guidance, the greater our ability to access this intelligence more frequently. Heart intelligence underlies cellular organization and guides and evolves organisms toward increased order, awareness and coherence of their bodies’ systems. (https://www. Heartmath.org/support/faqs/research/).

Movement that combines all the mind, body and heart for self-monitoring and keeping the immune system strong and healthy to better combat the challenges of viruses and unknowns ahead. Everyone is different so pick the exercise and physical movement that fits your preference and lifestyle. I offer the suggestion of yoga. As yoga incorporates movements, breath and meditations that address the unresolved distress in the body, leading to health and wellbeing. Another way that fear encroaches in our life is it evokes feelings of being out of control. This loss of control can manifest in anxiety, despair and stress that leads to visualizing all the ways this unknown can lead to your demise. Yoga is said to encompass the following healing components, “Conceivably, asanas particularly have a positive effect on fitness and physical flexibility with a secondary effect on the mental state, while the pranayama practices and relaxation/meditation techniques may result in greater awareness, less stress, and higher well-being and quality of life.” (https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/).

The five tips demonstrate as we take command of our life, live in the moment and embrace a consistent practice with intent and effort, our inner wisdom will rise to the top and offer discerning insight to make the decision and choices that meet our highest and best interests amongst the unknown. We all can take charge of our lives, be conscious and present to choose to focus on the moment with joy and peace, despite the fears and storms outside our immediate control. Peace be with you.

Dr. Cheri McDonald

Dr. Cheri McDonald

About Dr. Cheri McDonald

Dr. Cheri McDonald is the founder of Break Free with Dr. Cheri and creator of To Love…& Beyond. She helps couples unbury their marriages from the avalanche of PTSD for over 30 years by guiding clients to resurrecting themselves first and then bringing their companion up with them. Dr Cheri received her Bachelor of Science at Brigham Young University in Family Sciences in 1983. She continued her education at California Lutheran University where she obtained her Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy in 1987. Dr Cheri then completed her formal education in 2007 with a Doctorate degree in Philosophy of Clinical Hypnotherapy at Pacific University. She currently resides in Westlake Village, CA.

A Plant-Based, Dairy-Inspired Dish

With the rise in popularity of plant-based diets and dishes, combining them with dairy products can create a superfood power couple. For example, the cheddar cheese found in these Vegetarian Stuffed Peppers helps optimize nutrient absorption from the rice, black beans, corn and tomatoes to create a nutritious and delicious appetizer or meal.

Find more recipes that combine the goodness of dairy and plant-based foods at milkmeansmore.org.

Watch video to see how to make this recipe!

Vegetarian Stuffed Peppers

  • 6             large sweet bell peppers
  • 1/2         cup diced sweet onion
  • 1             cup cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
  • 1             cup frozen corn, thawed
  • 1 1/2     cups cooked black beans plain (drained and rinsed if using canned beans)
  • 2             cups cooked brown rice
  • 1/2         teaspoon chipotle chili powder
  • 1/2         teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2         teaspoon ground cumin
  • 3/4         teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2         teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 1/2     cups shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese, divided
  1. Preheat the oven to 350º F. Line a rimmed half sheet pan with non-stick aluminum foil.
  2. Slice the tops off of the sweet bell peppers. Use a spoon to scoop the seeds and white membranes from the insides of the peppers. Discard the pepper tops and seeds. Place the peppers onto the prepared half sheet pan; briefly set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, stir together the diced onion, cherry tomatoes, corn, black beans, and brown rice until combined. Sprinkle the chili powder, oregano, salt, and pepper over top before stirring to distribute the seasonings throughout. Fold 1 cup of the Cheddar cheese into the filling, reserving the remaining cheese for later.
  4. Stuff the open cavities of the sweet bell peppers tightly with filling, mounding a bit of the filling over the top edge of the peppers. Sprinkle the remaining Cheddar cheese over top of the filling. Bake the stuffed peppers for 30 to 35 minutes or until filling is heated through, the peppers soften, and the exteriors begin to wrinkle. Serve immediately. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
United Dairy Industry of Michigan

Resolve to Make Real Nutrition a New Year Priority

A new year signals a chance to renew your commitment to healthier eating, but many of the most popular diets, like the keto diet and paleo diet, eliminate entire food groups, which can cause you to fall short on nutrients you need.

For example, a study in the “Journal of Clinical Lipidology” suggests low-carb diets may not have meaningful long-term benefits for weight or heart health compared to other diets and could actually restrict foods that are good for your heart.

This new year, instead of jumping on restrictive diet bandwagons, focus instead on consuming real, wholesome foods you can still enjoy, like dairy milk, that deliver benefits backed by decades of research.

Consider these tips for incorporating nutrient-rich foods into a few trending diets to make them work for you.

Intermittent Fasting: Skipping meals could do more harm than good if you’re not getting the nutrients you need to be your best. A better bet: balanced, flavorful meals that incorporate multiple food groups. If you really want to try intermittent fasting, consider not eating past a certain time in the evening so you can “fast” throughout the night, and make sure to eat a nourishing breakfast in the morning, like oatmeal made with real milk, topped with fruit and a handful of nuts.

Plant-Packed Plates: If you’re considering a vegetarian or plant-based diet in the new year, it’s important to pack the right nutrients into your meatless meals, particularly protein, calcium, vitamin D and vitamin B12. Make sure you’re getting enough by enjoying a variety of plant-based foods like beans, nuts, fruits and vegetables along with some other thoughtfully chosen options. Real dairy milk is a good choice in a vegetarian diet, providing as much as eight times more protein than many non-dairy milk alternatives. Each 8-ounce glass is also a source of vitamin D, and an excellent source of calcium and vitamin B12.

Focus On Fats: If you’re keeping closer tabs on your fat intake, it’s important to choose the right ones and know that a growing body of evidence suggests not all saturated fats are the same. For example, whole milk, which has more dairy fat than skim or low-fat varieties, may actually help raise “good” cholesterol and could be considered part of a diet that’s also good for your heart, according to research in the “European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.”

Calorie Conscious: Monitoring the calories you consume versus the calories you burn through exercise and everyday activity can help manage the fuel your body needs. When you consistently burn more calories than you eat, you are more likely to effectively lose weight. However, that doesn’t mean you have to forgo all your favorite foods. For example, when it comes to dairy, swapping full-fat options for skim or low-fat alternatives is one way to receive the same nutrient package with less fat and calories.

Make better nutritional balance a priority this new year and find more advice and recipes at MilkLife.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
MilkPEP

How to Start a Keto Diet

(Family Features) Starting a keto diet continues to be one of the leading trends in nutrition, though many find the transition to be daunting. Kristin Kirkpatrick, RDN, Quest Nutrition spokesperson and former nutrition lead for the Cleveland Clinic, recommends these guidelines for a day on the meal plan to help you get started. Find more information at questketo.com.

SOURCE:
Quest Nutrition

Understanding Rare Cancers

Four facts to know about one type of rare cancer, soft tissue sarcomas

Although rare cancers don’t occur often, they can affect people of all ages and genders.

A rare cancer is defined as fewer than 15 new diagnoses per 100,000 people per year, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Additionally, as noted by the American Cancer Society (ACS), the 5-year survival rate is lower for people diagnosed with a rare cancer than for people living with more common cancers. Greater awareness of rare cancers may lead to earlier diagnosis and management, and potentially better survival rates.

  1. There are more than 50 types of soft tissue sarcomas (STS). STS account for about 1% of all cancers and affect soft tissues such as muscle, fat, nerves, blood vessels and skin. Although STS can be found in any part of the body, they are often in the arms or legs, internal organs, the back of the abdominal cavity or in the trunk, head and neck area.

If you have recently been diagnosed with STS, it’s important to ask your doctor for more information about the specific sub-type you have. For example, if you received a diagnosis of undifferentiated sarcoma, ask your doctor for an integrase interactor-1 (INI1) test to see if you have a rare STS called epithelioid sarcoma (ES). (See sidebar for more on ES.)

  1. STS can be visible or invisible depending on location. STS may appear as painless bumps under the skin, usually on arms or legs. Some sarcomas begin in the abdomen and typically don’t show symptoms until they grow and press on nearby organs, nerves, muscles or blood vessels. When this occurs, symptoms may include pain and trouble breathing.
  1. Early diagnosis can help inform disease management. As with other types of cancer, early diagnosis of STS is key, as earlier treatment may result in more favorable outcomes. Because other conditions can cause similar symptoms, it’s important to check with your doctor if you are experiencing any of the warning signs listed above. If your doctor decides it’s best to “watch and wait,” consider developing a six-week follow-up plan in partnership with your health care team if your symptoms have not improved.
  1. Seeking care from a specialist is key. Given the rarity of STS, finding a sarcoma specialist who understands the complexity of this rare disease and can help determine which treatment option is best for you is important. Treatment options depend on multiple factors, including your overall health, the location and type of tumor, its size and whether the disease has spread elsewhere in the body. STS are typically treated with a combination of options including chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery. A specialist may also speak to you about participating in a clinical trial where investigational therapies in STS are being studied.

Learning More About Epithelioid Sarcoma

A rare type of STS, epithelioid sarcoma (ES) accounts for less than 1% of all STS, which themselves account for approximately 1% of all cancers, according to research published in “Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine.” ES can present as a lump or sore on the skin.

Notably, more than 90% of ES tumors do not express the INI1 protein, which when present acts to suppress tumor growth. INI1 loss plays an important role in the diagnosis of ES, according to researchers with “The American Journal of Surgical Pathology.”

Data from the NCI indicates that approximately 150-200 people in the United States are diagnosed with ES each year. Research published in “The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology” found the disease often occurs in young adults in their 20s and 30s. Because most ES patients are adolescents and young adults, there is a gap in the unique psycho-social needs for this patient population, including resources for patients who miss school while undergoing treatments, as well as fertility considerations later in life.

If you or someone you love is living with ES, you can find resources, information and the real-life perspective of an ES survivor at ESsentialsforES.com. (Family Features)

Content courtesy of Epizyme, Inc.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

SOURCE:
Epizyme