Refresh Your Child’s Diet with Low-Sugar Options

Many families look to the new year as a time to reset their eating habits and focus on making healthier choices. However, adults aren’t the only ones who could use a menu refresh as children may also need to focus on healthier food choices.

A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed children consume an unhealthy amount of added sugar every day. Researchers found nearly all of the toddlers in their study ate an average of 7 teaspoons of added sugar daily – the equivalent of a candy bar. Additionally, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, excess sugar consumption can lead to an increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

“Small children have small stomachs,” said Courtney Hines, a nutritionist for KinderCare Learning Centers, which care for more than 165,000 children around the country every day. “You want them to fill up on nutrient-dense foods, not empty calories in the form of added sugar. When children consume lots of sugar, their palates get used to overly sweet flavors. They may not accept other, less sugary flavors or learn to appreciate the natural sweetness of a piece of fresh fruit.”

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends against the consumption of added sugar for children under the age of 2. Children ages 2-18 should aim for less than 25 grams, or 6 teaspoons, of added sugar per day.

For families that want to cut down on the amount of added sugar in their diets, Hines recommends cooking more at home, relying less on processed, packaged foods and serving only water or milk for beverages.

Consider these low-sugar ideas for meal and snack times to help control the amount of added sugar you and your family consume.

Dip Smart

Herbs, spices, citrus and fresh fruit add flavor without relying on the added sugars found in many popular sauces and dips. Consider making your own low-sugar alternatives at home so your family can still enjoy favorite flavors like these:

  • Ranch Dressing – In a bowl, combine mayonnaise, buttermilk, parsley, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper for a kid-tested, nutritionist-approved take on a favorite dip. Serve over salad or as vegetable dip.
  • Honey Mustard – Popular on a variety of sandwiches and as a dip or salad dressing, combining plain yogurt with milk, honey and regular or Dijon mustard can create a more family-friendly version.
  • Teriyaki Sauce – Perfect for serving with healthier options like lo mein, chicken wraps or fried rice, a homemade version can be created using water, soy sauce, honey, ginger, garlic powder and cornstarch slurry.

Swap Out Syrup

Pancakes are a popular breakfast option at KinderCare centers and in many homes, but even the healthiest whole-grain pancake becomes a plateful of sugar if it’s doused in syrup. Hines recommends these toppings that are sweet and savory without the added sugar:

  • Nut butter or seed butter (such as peanut, almond or sun) and banana slices
  • Warm fruit compote (mix of warmed berries)
  • Applesauce (no-sugar-added variety) and cinnamon
  • Nut butter swirled into plain yogurt; mix in 1-2 teaspoons vanilla extract to add a sweet flavor

Snack Sweet

Opting for less added sugar doesn’t mean avoiding sweet snacks altogether. These alternatives can still help satisfy those cravings:

  • Applesauce with baked cinnamon pita triangles for dipping
  • Toast topped with nut or seed butter, smashed banana and sprinkle of cinnamon
  • Frozen fruit smoothies
  • Plain yogurt topped with granola, nuts, seeds or fruit
  • Apple slices with nut or seed butter

For more ideas to introduce your children to healthy habits from a young age, visit kindercare.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
KinderCare

Psychiatrist’s 8 Tips to Reducing Holiday Stress

The festive season is so much fun for many people. However, for some, family get-togethers, festive season shopping, cooking, and more make them feel stressed and anxious. Festive season stress is a real thing and it’s something that mental health professionals help their patients with during November and December. How can you help yourself feel better?

Vinay Saranga, M.D.

Vinay Saranga, M.D.

Vinay Saranga M.D., is a psychiatrist and founder of Saranga Comprehensive Psychiatry (www.sarangapsychiatry.com).

He offers these tips:

  •  Breathe: One of the best ways to reduce stress and anxiety is to slowdown your breathing. When we are stressed, overwhelmed, worried or something is bothering us, our breathing tends to get fast and shallow. This actually makes us feel worse than we are already feeling. Focus on slowing down your breathing. Breath in through the diaphragm (stomach area), hold for a few seconds, and slowly exhale through the lips.
  •  Mindfulness: When you start worrying about preparing Thanksgiving dinner, shopping for gifts, or uncomfortable topics of conversation coming up with family you don’t see that often, practice mindfulness. This is the act of being present and immersing yourself in the present moment. It’s easy to dwell on the past and worry about the future, but being in the present moment is the best place to focus your energy.
  •  Take a break: The festive season can be overwhelming for many people. It’s okay to take a break. Go for a walk. Take a drive and turn up the tunes. Hit the gym. Surf the web. Go to your favorite place and just people watch. It doesn’t matter what you do. If you feel your anxiety levels rising, take a break from what you’re doing and connect to something that makes you feel good.
  •  Avoid controversial issues: There’s nothing like a heated debate over things like sex, politics or religion to ruin what should be a nice family together and stress you out. If a topic feels too far out there, or if you know that people have very differing points of views, stay away from it. Focus conversations around TV shows, movies, music, books, reliving memories and other fun and interesting topics.
  •  Get outdoors: It’s easy to get stuck inside watching the parades and footballs games, but getting some fresh air and a little activity can be good for everyone. Think of games to play outside. Go for a bike ride or a walk around the block. Watch the kids get involved in an activity. A little fresh air can relieve stress and holiday tension.
  •  Comfort yourself: Whether you don’t like the family get-togethers or large gatherings just stress you out, be kind to yourself with the language you choose. Remind yourself that it’s only a few hours and you can get through it. Spend time around the people with whom you have the most in common or the ones who don’t stress you out as much. Remember to smile as this not only makes you appear to be enjoying yourself, it really will help you feel better.
  •  Stay on your meds and keep doctor appointments: The festive season and long family get-togethers can be tough for many people, but even more so if you are suffering with a mental health condition. The holiday season is not the time to come off your medication. Remember to keep all doctor appointments and stick to your therapeutic routine. 
  •  Take a trip: If the festive season really stresses you out that much, there is no shame in telling people that this year you are getting away and taking a family vacation. Going on a cruise, heading to the mountains or whatever you choose to do is perfectly acceptable. You are not being selfish by putting the needs of you and your family first and foremost.

Prevention is Better Than the Cure: How Functional Medicine Can Change Your Life

Integrative approaches to health are becoming more and more common. In the city of Tyler, the
Adventum Mindfulness Triathlon is a mind-body wellness approach that has been gaining some traction. It involves a two-mile run or walk, doing yoga for 45 minutes, and ends with 20 minutes of meditation. The triathlon also offers sessions with counselors, chiropractors, and other specialists. Meanwhile, in Amarillo, the ReCODE Program which is based on preventing and reducing inflammation, optimizing nutritional intake, and the systemic elimination of toxins in the body has been the first program to actually improve the mental state of dementia patients. These integrative approaches to treating both mental and physical ailments are reminding patients and doctors that the old adage still holds: prevention is better than the cure — the core idea behind the practice of functional medicine.

Functional medicine (FM) is a scientific approach to holistic medicine. In a nutshell, its aim is to keep you not just alive, but healthy, happy, and well. The main difference between FM and conventional medicine is that the former is focused on prevention, while the latter is about treatment. For instance, A post by Parsley Health on ‘5 Reasons Why Functional Medicine is the Only Kind of Health Care You Want’ explains that while the conventional triage approach is the best way to prevent death or further trauma when treatment is needed, it has nothing to do with your health and quality of life outside the emergency room or clinic. In contrast, FM is focused on what can be done now to mitigate or prevent trauma and disease later.

This doesn’t mean that FM is opposed to conventional and other forms of medical treatment. Far from it — treatment begins with anything and everything that can significantly improve your health, quality of life, and resistance to chronic diseases and conditions. This approach begins with knowing your medical history. Questionnaires and interviews allow FM specialists to find out every bit of information that can be used to improve their patients’ overall health and wellness. This assessment of your medical history determines the program that you need to follow.

FM programs are mostly personalized lifestyle changes geared towards long-term wellness. The biggest factor that dictates our physical and mental health is nutrition, which is where these programs begin. This is hinged on the fact that we are what we eat — scientifically speaking, whatever we consume inevitably ends up being used by our bodies to repair and maintain daily and special functions. This is why FM specialist Dr. Robin Berzin doesn’t recommend any specific diet for health purposes, but instead suggests following personalized nutritional plans to meet every person’s unique needs. For most patients, this means eating a greater variety of plants while also decreasing their intake of highly processed food. The actual recipes or meal plans will be determined by the current state of your health as well as your goals.

Also, by optimizing daily food intake, you can either avoid having to take pharmaceutical medication that might have long-term adverse effects, or at least supplement their positive effects so you’ll need less potentially harmful medication. For instance, for sufferers of gout or chronic joint inflammation, sticking to an optimized diet means not having to take too much non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which are known to wreak havoc on the liver. Through nutritional programs, FM specialists can help you decrease or completely avoid the long-term consequences of certain pharmaceutical treatments.

Regular exercise factors into FM programs as well. There’s a ton of research that shows how regular physical activity improves health. Our article on ‘Defeating Obesity with These Isometric Exercises’ shows how even the simplest, safest exercises can help mitigate and prevent chronic disease. Meanwhile, strenuous exercise has long been shown to help people deal with insomnia.

As for mental health concerns, FM specialists also either provide consultations or refer patients to mental health practitioners who can provide talk therapy and, if necessary, prescription medication. FM recognizes how the mind influences the body’s ability to heal and stay healthy, which further illustrates the value of taking an integrative and inter-disciplinary approach to health and wellness.

By combining these different approaches to human health, FM seeks to address the root causes of illness. The mind controls the body; the body affects the mind — what we do and consume with both determines the state of our health.

Are Your Lungs Trying to Tell You Something?

Do you get short of breath doing daily activities? Feel like you’re unable to take deep breaths? Are you constantly coughing or wheezing? If you said yes to any of these questions, you may be experiencing symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a serious, potentially devastating lung disease also known as chronic bronchitis or emphysema. Though it’s easy to think of these symptoms as just part of “getting older’’ or as problems that come with allergies, often they are not.

Nearly 16 million people in the United States are currently living with a COPD diagnosis, and millions more don’t know they have it. COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of disability.

In people with COPD, the airways that carry air in and out of the lungs become partially blocked, which makes it increasingly difficult to breathe. If left undetected, the disease can greatly affect your quality of life and your ability to complete even ordinary daily activities.

COPD often occurs in people who have a history of smoking or long-term exposure to secondhand smoke and other lung irritants, such as air pollution, chemical fumes, and dusts from the environment or workplace. The chances of getting COPD also increases significantly in people who have alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a rare genetic condition.

While COPD develops slowly and worsens over time, its symptoms can be treated and its progression can be slowed, which is why early detection and treatment are so important. If you are noticing any issues with your breathing, talk to your health care provider about getting tested for COPD. The sooner you get a diagnosis, the sooner treatment can begin. Your provider will design a treatment plan to help address your symptoms and improve your lung function and quality of life.

The key to keeping COPD at bay – or preventing it from getting worse – is to understand and recognize the signs and symptoms early and discuss them with your health care provider. The sooner this happens, the sooner you can get back to doing the things you love.

Through educational efforts like the Learn More Breathe Better program (https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/breathebetter ), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute shares valuable information about the symptoms of COPD, as well as how to diagnose and treat it. With these tools, those living with COPD can effectively manage the disease, and those who have symptoms can find the support and assistance they need. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Defeating Obesity with These Isometric Exercises

An isometric exercise or workout is a type of training where the muscle length or joint angle doesn’t change. Simply put, the body stays static while it applies force. Some isometric exercise examples can be as simple as pushing your palms together or be as intense as holding a barbell at the peak of a curl. This is why they are so convenient and safe; people can perform them anytime, anywhere with an almost zero chance of injuries.

Shoulder Press 

  • Stand up straight and bend your left elbow by your side, fist up.
  • Place your right palm on top of your left fist. Your right arm should be parallel to the ground with your elbow bent about 90 degrees.
  • Press your right palm into your left fist and hold this for 10 seconds. Repeat on the other side.
  • Do this complete exercise 10 times.

Trunk Rotation

A5_Trunk-Rotation.jpg

  • Place your left palm on your right shoulder.
  • Keep your right arm relaxed by your side.
  • Keep your back straight and both hips square. Rotate your torso to the left as you push your left palm into your right shoulder.
  • Hold this for 10 seconds and repeat on the other side.
  • Do this complete exercise 10 times.

Chair Pose 

Chair-Pose.png

This classic yoga pose works your entire body. Combined with isometric holds, it is an effective, efficient way to get in a full-body exercise in just a few minutes.

  • Stand up with your knees and feet touching.
  • Extend both arms in front of you.
  • Slowly squat down as if you’re sitting in a chair.
  • Squeeze your thigh muscles together and contract your abs.
  • Hold this pose for 10 seconds, then return to a standing position.
  • Do this 10 times.

Be Prepared When Natural Disaster Strikes

Emergency situations, especially those that pertain to natural disasters, can be difficult to recover from without proper planning, which is why it’s important to take small steps from the start to help protect your family.

With the change of seasons comes an increased risk of weather-related emergencies. This fall, Clorox has partnered with the American Red Cross to encourage everyone to be “Red Cross Ready.”

Consider these three actionable steps to get your household ready for an emergency:

Prepare a kit: At minimum, you should have an emergency kit assembled with basic supplies. Depending on the circumstances, you may need to evacuate versus remaining in your home, which will affect the amount of supplies you need. A good rule of thumb is a three-day supply if you are evacuating and a two-week supply if you’ll be in your home.

  • Water: Keep one gallon per person, per day
  • Food: Stock up on non-perishable, easy-to-prepare items.
  • Disinfecting bleach: After a natural disaster, water may not be safe to drink. A few drops of an option like Clorox Disinfecting Bleach can be used to make water potable and can also help clean up mold and fungi from a buildup of excess moisture. Always pay close attention to the label to be sure you are following exact dilution instructions.
  • Flashlight (and extra batteries): Having a flashlight ensures that you’re able to navigate in the dark if the electricity goes out. Always keep extra batteries on-hand to power your flashlight and other items you may need.
  • First aid kit: In cases of emergency, first-aid supplies are crucial to help keep family members as safe and healthy as possible. Make sure to stock the kit with things like bandages, gauze and antibiotic creams.
  • Multi-purpose tool: Tools with multiple functions can be used for everything from cutting wire to opening bottles.
  • Sanitation and personal hygiene items: In addition to disinfecting bleach, it’s important to keep things like moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal cleanliness.

Make a plan: Discuss how to prepare with your family or household members and talk about the best ways you can respond to the types of emergencies that are most likely to happen where you live, learn, work and play. Identify responsibilities for each member of your household and how you will work together as a team. Practice as many elements of your plan as possible.

Be informed: As an emergency is unfolding, normal communication systems like phone lines may be damaged or overloaded by call volume. Consider downloading smartphone apps such as the Red Cross Emergency App for customizable weather alerts, the “I’m safe”feature and other resources. It provides instant access to information for handling common first aid emergencies. You can also get trained in first aid and CPR so you’ll know what to do in case emergency help is delayed.

After a natural disaster, a safe and healthy recovery is key. Listen to local authorities and take safety precautions in case of storm aftershocks. Only use cellular or landline phones to report life-threatening conditions, keeping lines open for emergency responders. Return to your home only when authorities advise it’s safe to do so, making sure to also have photo identification to prove residency.

Learn more at clorox.com/redcrossready. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Clorox

5 Ways to Empower Kids to End Bullying

From the classroom to the internet, bullying can lead to children developing a poor self-image or lead to bullying others. In fact, members of Generation Z believe bullying is the biggest issue facing their generation, according to new data.

A survey of American youth ages 6-17, commissioned by the Boy Scouts of America, the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training, found bullying ranked as the top concern for young people in their own communities, across the country and on a global scale. At the same time, 84% of those surveyed said they want to be a part of the solution.

Consider these ideas to help your kids learn how to overcome, avoid and break down the cycle of bullying:

Promote more time unplugged and outdoors. It is important for parents to promote healthy, face-to-face social interactions. Outdoor activities allow children to work together, solve problems and bond in a way that typically can’t be achieved through a screen. They also give children a break from the cyber-world, where bullying is often prevalent.

Encourage kindness. Ninety-seven percent of Gen Z members surveyed said being kind is important. Encourage kids to act on that feeling and remind them that it doesn’t take any extra energy to be kind. Serve as a role model by making kindness a foundation in your family, just as the Boy Scouts of America have done. The Scout Law lists being kind as one of 12 guiding characteristics.

Educate and equip. Parents should educate their children about why bullying is never OK, equip them with the knowledge they’ll need to recognize it and encourage them to report and safely respond to all forms of bullying they observe.

Use the buddy system. In Scouting, the buddy system pairs kids together to help ensure the well-being of one another. This approach is used for practical and safety reasons that can also be applied to everyday life. A pair or group of kids are less likely to get bullied, and buddies can be supportive by being an upstander.

Explore differences. As a family, look for ways to get involved in activities that include families from different backgrounds and cultures. Introducing kids to ideas and lifestyles different from their own can be an enlightening experience, and that knowledge can help break down some of the barriers that contribute to bullying, such as fear and misunderstanding.

Improving Communities

Creating a better community may be a collaborative goal, but as survey data from the Boy Scouts of America shows, the solutions lie much closer to home and can be inspired by the acts of individuals:

  • 97% of those surveyed said being kind to others is important.
  • 84% said they want to be a part of solving community issues in the future.
  • 79% said improving their community is important.
  • 50% said the reason they focus on some of these issues because their parents are passionate about them.
  • Bullying was a top concern among respondents, with 86% of respondents saying that not being bullied is a daily priority and 30% saying that out of 20-plus societal issues, bullying is the problem they most want solved globally.
  • Other top concerns respondents want to help solve are hunger (28%) and care for elders (27%) at the local level; animal rights (28%) and recycling (28%) at the national level; and poverty (28%) and human rights (26%) at the global level.

Learn more about ways Generation Z and its supporters can help put an end to bullying at Scouting.org.

SOURCE:
Boy Scouts of America

Steps to Better Sleep for Peak Sports Performance

For fans and athletes alike, fall means gearing up for a new season of sports activities. While plenty of attention goes into developing skills and talent, other important components that affect an athlete’s performance can be overlooked. Especially considering the demands of an athlete’s training and game schedule, getting adequate sleep is often an afterthought.

However, a lack of sleep can significantly affect athletes’ performance both on and off the field.

Sleep quality, efficiency and duration all may decrease just before competition, limiting opportunities for athletes to get the optimal quality and quantity of sleep their bodies need due to intense practice and game schedules, according to research published in “Sports Medicine.”

The same research found sleep can affect several aspects of an athlete’s performance. Skills that require endurance tend to be more affected by sleep deprivation than short-term, high-power activities. Running speed and free throw accuracy improve with more sleep, for example. There is also evidence that getting inadequate sleep increases the risk of injury as sleep deprivation can cause low energy and problems with focus during the game. It may also negatively affect split-second decision-making.

Less sleep also means fewer opportunities for natural secretion of the growth hormones that occur in deep sleep and aide restoration, physical performance and a healthy metabolism.

Athletes can maximize their performance, recovery and overall health with these tips from Mattress Firm’s sleep health expert, Dr. Sujay Kansagra:

  • Ensure you are getting between 7-9 hours of sleep each night. Athletes may need additional sleep due to strenuous daytime activity.
  • Keep your wake time and bedtime similar, regardless of your training schedule. Don’t wake up early to practice one day and sleep in the next. Try to keep it consistent.
  • If you have trouble falling asleep, avoid workouts late in the evening just before bed.
  • For competitive sports teams that travel across time zones, it’s important to try to adjust your circadian rhythm based on the time you will be playing in the new time zone. The goal is to time the game to when circadian rhythm and alertness are at their peaks, in the late morning and late afternoon or evening.
  • As the body works to repair itself during sleep, creating muscle tissue and releasing important hormones, sleeping on the proper mattress can provide support that aids in reducing aches and pains. If you need help selecting the right mattress, the experts at a retailer like Mattress Firm have a variety of sizes, options and accessories available that won’t break the bank.

Find more advice to ensure a better night’s sleep at MattressFirm.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Mattress Firm

The Benefits of Service Dogs

Supporting veterans when they return home

Service dogs offer countless benefits to help combat symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but they can also be instrumental in rebuilding and uniting families after veterans come home from serving their country.

According to the National Institutes of Health, up to 30% of American military veterans experience PTSD after returning home from combat. Yet only about 40% of those individuals ever seek help.

Service animals are recognized under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The designation is limited to dogs who are trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability. In some cases, these tasks are highly physical in nature, such as guiding a person who is blind or pulling a wheelchair. Other roles service dogs play may be less immediately visible, such as providing a calming presence to a person with PTSD who is experiencing an anxiety attack.

More Than a Companion

Service dogs are highly trained to assist military veterans in achieving better quality of life. Veterans who utilize service dogs report lower levels of depression and anxiety, fewer hospitalizations and a reduction in medical and psychiatric costs, among other benefits. Beyond what these canines help prevent, consider these examples of what they empower:

  • Ease loneliness and stress
  • Reduce social anxiety
  • Decrease reliance on prescription drugs
  • Help veterans return to work or attend college
  • Strengthen personal relationships
  • Provide security, protection and unconditional love

Up to the Task

Just like the members of the armed forces they help, service dogs are highly trained professionals with an important job to do, including tasks such as these:

  • Turn on lights and open doors before a veteran enters his or her home
  • Nudging, pawing or licking to interrupt flashbacks or nightmares
  • Utilizing body weight as a grounding mechanism to reduce anxiety or alleviate panic
  • Retrieve bags with medications or a list of numbers to call during a medical emergency
  • Provide security and reduce hypervigilance in public places
  • Pick up dropped items and assist with mobility and ambulation

When You See a Service Dog

Service dogs are often large breeds that stand out in a crowd, and their calm demeanor can make it seem perfectly appropriate to approach and pet them. However, it’s important to remember that service dogs are at work and distractions can prevent them from providing the service their owners need.

The International Association of Canine Professionals offers these etiquette tips for interacting with service dogs and their owners:

  • Remember that a service dog is there as support for a person with a physical or health disability, which may or may not be readily apparent.
  • Respect that health conditions are private matters most people prefer not to discuss with strangers.
  • Just as you would not stare or point at a person in a wheelchair, avoid calling unnecessary attention to a person with a service dog.
  • If you must interact, always focus your attention on the handler, not the dog, so the dog can stay focused on its job. Avoid whistling, clapping or otherwise distracting the dog.
  • Teach children not to approach service dogs. Although most are trained to avoid aggression, a perceived threat to their handlers could result in warning growls or barks that may scare a child.

To see video stories of how service dogs have impacted the lives of veterans and their families, visit DogChow.com/service. In addition, for every purchase of specially marked bags of Dog Chow Complete Adult through Nov. 1, the brand will donate 5 cents, up to $100,000, to the Tony La Russa Animal Rescue Foundation Pets and Vets program, which matches veterans experiencing PTSD and other challenges with service dogs, free of charge. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Purina Dog Chow

8 Tips to Eliminate Overwhelm From Your Life

Whether you are a busy professional, a student or a stay at home mom, overwhelm is something that most people face. If not properly dealt with, it can lead to stress, anxiety and a host of both mental and physical problems. So, what are some great ways to deal with overwhelm?

Overwhelm 2

Dr. Alok Trivedi is a psychological performance expert who is founder of the Aligned Performance Institute and author of the book ‘Chasing Success.’ He offers these eight tips to deal with overwhelm: 

  • Become more fulfilled: Contrary to what you might believe, feeling overwhelmed isn’t usually a result of having too much on your plate. Overwhelm comes from not being fulfilled in the activities you are taking part in. If you know someone who is always on the go and never has time to stop, yet seems so happy and satisfied, it’s because they are doing things they truly enjoy. When you align yourself with your life’s purpose, overwhelm quickly disappears.
  • Stop multitasking: We’ve been sold this great big lie that multitasking is the solution to gaining more time. It’s not. Multitasking overwhelms us even more and detracts from quality. The best solution is to take one task at a time. Take on something, give it your best, and when it’s finished move on to the next item on your list. Your stress and anxiety will also quickly disappear.
  • Make time for you: As busy as you are, you always have to make time for yourself each and every day. Even as little as 30 minutes to seek out some solitude or engage in an activity that you find pleasurable is important to how you feel and your overall well-being. Even the most successful people in any field carve out a little time for themselves and they never miss a day.
  • Get in the moment: People who tend to feel overwhelmed are usually reliving painful experiences in their past or worrying about what is coming up in the future. Instead, ground yourself in the present moment and what is taking place around you right now. If you have trouble with this, ask yourself questions like: What do I see? Who am I with? What do I smell? What am I doing?
  • Stop chasing perfect: People who struggle with overwhelm tend to always be chasing perfection. Even when they complete a task that turns out exceptionally well, they still strive to make it better. The secret is to always give your best, and let it stop after that. Perfection is a delusion that will lead to too much stress, anxiety and overwhelm, and can even make you physically sick.
  • Stop beating yourself up: People who have a hard time with feeling overwhelmed usually are very hard on themselves. They are the type that look back on a completed task or project and start questioning why they did what they did, and why they didn’t say this or approach it some other way. You have to be your best friend and number-one cheerleader. If not, you’re setting yourself up for failure, misery and a lifetime of being overwhelmed with the results of everything you do.
  • Clear up the confusion: Another reason people experience overwhelm is because they are confused. It could be a situation where you have to choose between two similar things, or where multiple people in your inner-circle are giving you different versions of a story. To decrease the overwhelm, don’t let the problem fester for too long. Sort out the facts and get to the bottom of it as soon as possible.

  • Take a break: If you feel like you’ve hit your breaking point, just stop and walk away. Put it all down, take a break and go do something else. Once you hit the point of mental overload, you’re not thinking clearly or performing at your best. The best way to break free from the emotional load of overwhelm is to get away and rest. In fact, it’s for this reason that many top performers take regular breaks throughout the day.