Beat Winter Blues with a Little Help From Vitamin D

Wholesome ingredients can help up your intake during the dark days of winter

Staying indoors and wrapping up in a blanket is one way to avoid winter’s frigid weather, but less exposure to the sun can also put you at risk of a vitamin D deficiency. Milk is the primary source of vitamin D in the American diet, according to research published in the FASEB Journal, making it a great choice on dark winter days.

An 8-ounce glass of milk provides 30 percent of the daily value of vitamin D, so just three cups of milk each day will provide 90 percent of your body’s recommended daily requirements. Milk is also an easy way to get other essential nutrients like B vitamins for energy, high-quality protein for lean muscle and vitamin A for a healthy immune system.

When you need a quick way to warm up on a cold day, try this creamy chicken corn chowder recipe that can be made with a pressure cooker. Cooked with wholesome ingredients like milk, chicken and potatoes and topped with bacon and green onions, it’s an easy and delicious addition to your weekly meal rotation. For more recipes to warm up your winter, visit milklife.com.

Pressure Cooker Corn Chowder

Servings: 12

  • 6          slices (6 ounces each) thick-cut bacon, chopped
  • 1          small yellow onion, diced
  • 3          cloves garlic, minced
  • 1          pound boneless skinless chicken breast, diced
  • 1          bag (16 ounces, about 3 1/3 cups) frozen corn kernels
  • 4          cups chicken broth
  • 1          pound unpeeled or peeled Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into 1/4-1/2-inch chunks
  • 1/2       teaspoon kosher salt, plus additional, to taste
  • 1/2       teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper, plus additional, to taste
  • 2          tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 1/2    cups fat-free milk
  • 2-3       green onions, sliced (optional)
  • 1          tablespoon heavy cream or half-and-half (optional)
  1. Heat large skillet over medium-high heat. Add chopped bacon and cook until crispy. Using a slotted spoon, transfer cooked bacon to paper towel-lined plate and pour off all but 1 tablespoon bacon fat.
  2. Return skillet to stove. Add onion and garlic; saute 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add diced chicken and frozen corn; saute for an additional 3 minutes, stirring often.
  3. Remove skillet from heat and transfer contents to pressure cooker. Add chicken broth, potatoes, salt and pepper. Close and seal pressure cooker, making sure the vent is in the sealed position. Cook on high 8 minutes.
  4. While the chowder cooks, make a slurry by whisking cornstarch (or flour) into milk. Set aside.
  5. When done, remove pressure cooker from heat. Allow pressure to release on its own or carefully quick-release pressure after a few minutes. Stir in the cornstarch-milk slurry. Cover and allow chowder to thicken for 10-15 minutes before serving.
  6. Portion soup into bowls and generously top with bacon. Garnish with green onion and cream or half-and-half, if desired. Season with additional salt and pepper, to taste.

Nutritional information per serving: 190 calories; 5 g fat; 1.5 g saturated fat; 35 mg cholesterol; 14 g protein; 20 g carbohydrates; 2 g fiber; 530 mg sodium; 52 mg calcium (6% of daily value). Nutrition figures based on using fat-free milk. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
MilkPEP

Find Out the Truth About Tap Water

While the tap water you drink may look clean, it may contain harmful contaminants like lead, pesticides and industrial pollutants. These and others may be picked up on the journey from your water treatment plant through miles of pipes to your home.

To help clear up any misconceptions about what’s really in your water, the experts at PUR offer this myth-busting advice:

Myth: Living close to a fresh water source makes tap water safer to drink.

Truth: Even if you live close to a fresh water source, your water goes on a long journey through an often aging infrastructure before it reaches your tap. According to Environmental Health & Engineering, Inc., up to 10 million lead service lines are still in use in the country today, potentially allowing lead particles to enter into your water.

Myth: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates all contaminants.

Truth: There are about 100,000 potential contaminants in drinking water. According to the EPA, its Safe Drinking Water Act only regulates 103. That means water that meets the government’s safe drinking standards may not meet yours.

Myth: All water filters are created equal.

Truth: While both pitcher and faucet filters remove unwanted contaminants, a faucet filter is usually a step up from a pitcher because it has a longer life and can remove even more contaminants, including lead.  As every brand is different, it’s important to check the types of contaminants each filter removes and confirm it is certified by NSF and the Water Quality Association for contamination reduction. Doing so can help you get the healthiest, cleanest tasting water possible.

Myth: You can determine if tap water is safe to drink by how it looks, smells and tastes.

Truth: While your water might look, smell and taste clean, it could contain contaminants that are potentially harmful to your health, like lead, which is colorless, odorless and has no taste.

“Knowing what’s in the water you drink and cook with is important, but determining the quality of your local water supply can seem daunting,” said Keri Glassman, registered dietitian, nutritionist and PUR spokesperson. “Fortunately, there’s a free online resource called KnowYourWater.com that allows users to type in any address to easily learn about lead and other possible contaminants in their water.”

Myth: Boiling water removes lead.

Truth: Boiling water may reduce bacteria found in the water, but will not remove lead. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the lead concentration of water can actually increase slightly when water is boiled because some of the water evaporates during the boiling process.

Myth: Drinking filtered water is expensive.

Truth: Using a faucet filtration system for one year is comparable in cost to purchasing enough bottled water to last only two months. An option like the PUR Advanced Faucet Filtration System is an on-demand solution for filtered water right from the tap and is certified to reduce over 70 contaminants, including 99 percent of lead, 96 percent of mercury and 92 percent of certain pesticides.

Get your individual water quality report and learn more at KnowYourWater.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
PUR

How Well Do You Know Your Birth Control?

As the future of contraception remains uncertain, one point bears reminding: access to birth control has come a long way.

It was not until 1960 that the first oral contraceptives – coined “birth control pills” or “the Pill” –were approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and hit the market.¹

Now, more than 50 years later, over 35 varieties of the Pill exist on the market.² Additional options have also been introduced: intrauterine devices (IUDs), vaginal rings, implants and more. Even with the availability of various birth control methods, the Pill remains the most popular form of contraception, used by over 10 million women of reproductive age in the U.S. annually.³

“When my patients express interest in prescription birth control for pregnancy prevention, while individual needs vary, I generally recommend they first try the Pill. If used appropriately, it can be an effective option for women,” OB/GYN Jessica Shepherd, M.D., said. “That said, because the Pill may not be right for everyone, it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider about your options and make the decision together.”

Whether you’re a woman considering prescription oral contraception or a parent whose daughter is exploring her options, Dr. Shepherd shares the following facts to help you get to know the birth control pill:

  • What are oral contraceptives? Oral contraceptives, also known as birth control pills or the Pill, are taken daily to prevent pregnancy. Oral contraceptives are the most popular form of birth control in the U.S.
  • How does the Pill work? There are several FDA-approved birth control pills on the market that contain various types and amounts of hormones, such as estrogen and progestin. They work to lower the risk of pregnancy primarily by suppressing ovulation, or the release of an egg from the ovary. Other possible ways that birth control pills work may include thickening the cervical mucus to prevent sperm from reaching the uterus, and by thinning the lining of the uterus (or endometrium) to make it less likely for an egg to attach there.
  • Is the Pill effective? Yes, the Pill is FDA-approved to prevent pregnancy and should be taken at the same time every day. Chances of becoming pregnant depend on how well directions for taking birth control pills are followed.
  • Does the Pill start working right away? When starting the Pill, use of back-up contraception is necessary, like condoms and spermicide, for the first seven days if a woman starts taking the Pill on any day other than the first day of her period.
  • What is an example of a prescription birth control pill? One option is Lo Loestrin® Fe (norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol tablets, ethinyl estradiol tablets and ferrous fumarate tablets), the No.1-prescribed birth control pill by OB/GYNs.4 With just 10 micrograms of daily estrogen, it is a birth control pill for pregnancy prevention with the lowest dose of daily estrogen available on the market.5 Please see Important Risk Information, including Boxed Warning, below.

For additional facts about the birth control pill, visit KnowYourBirthControl.com, and speak to your healthcare provider to determine the method that is right for you.

What is Lo Loestrin Fe?

Lo Loestrin Fe is a prescription birth control pill used for the prevention of pregnancy. If you are moderately obese, discuss with your healthcare provider whether Lo Loestrin Fe is appropriate for you.

 

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

WARNING TO WOMEN WHO SMOKE

Do not use Lo Loestrin Fe if you smoke cigarettes and are over 35 years old. Smoking increases your risk of serious cardiovascular side effects (heart and blood vessel problems) from birth control pills, including death from heart attack, blood clots, or stroke. This risk increases with age and the number of cigarettes you smoke.

 

Who should not take Lo Loestrin Fe?

Do not use Lo Loestrin Fe if you have or have had blood clots, history of heart attack or stroke, high blood pressure that medicine cannot control, breast cancer or any cancer that is sensitive to female hormones, liver disease or liver tumors, unexplained bleeding from the vagina, if you are or may be pregnant, or if you take Hepatitis C drugs containing ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir, with or without dasabuvir, as this may increase levels of liver enzymes in the blood.

Whatelse should I know about taking Lo Loestrin Fe?

Treatment with Lo Loestrin Fe should be stopped if you have a blood clot, and at least 4 weeks before and through 2 weeks after major surgery. You should not take Lo Loestrin Fe any earlier than 4 weeks after having a baby, or if you are breastfeeding. If you experience yellowing of the skin or eyes due to problems with your liver, you should stop taking Lo Loestrin Fe. If you are pre-diabetic or diabetic, your doctor should monitor you while using Lo Loestrin Fe. Your doctor should evaluate you if you have any significant change in headaches or irregular menstrual bleeding.

What are the most serious risks of taking Lo Loestrin Fe?

Lo Loestrin Fe increases the risk of serious conditions including blood clots, stroke, and heart attack. These can be life-threatening or lead to permanent disability.

What are the possible side effects of Lo Loestrin Fe?

The most common side effects reported by women taking Lo Loestrin Fe in a study were nausea/vomiting, headache, spotting or bleeding between menstrual periods, painful menstruation, weight change, breast tenderness, acne, abdominal pain, anxiety, and depression.

Birth control pills do not protect you against any sexually transmitted disease, including HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Please see the full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning, and Patient Information which are also available at loloestrin.com. (Family Features)

© 2017 Allergan. All rights reserved.

Allergan® and its design are trademarks of Allergan, Inc.

Lo Loestrin® and its design are registered trademarks of Allergan Pharmaceuticals International Limited.

LOL111689 11/17

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

¹Selections From FDLI Update Series on FDA History – FDA’s Approval of the First Oral Contraceptive, Enovid. (n.d.). Retrieved Nov. 9, 2017, from https://www.fda.gov/aboutfda/whatwedo/history/productregulation/selectionsfromfdliupdateseriesonfdahistory/ucm092009.htm

² Oral Contraceptives. (2017, Oct. 5). Retrieved Nov. 9, 2017, from http://www.empr.com/oral-contraceptives/printarticle/123837/

³Jones, J., Ph.D, Mosher, W., Ph.D, & Daniels, K., Ph.D. (2012). Current Contraceptive Use in the United States, 2006–2010, and Changes in Patterns of Use Since 1995. National Health Statistics Reports, (60), 1-26. Retrieved Nov. 7, 2017, from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr060.pdf.

4 IMS Health, Inc. Monthly New Rx by Specialty; December 2010-December 2016 (Claim derived from the use of information under license from IMS Health, Inc., which expressly reserves all rights, including rights of copying, distribution, and republication).

5 Lo Loestrin Fe prescribing information. Irvine, CA: Allergan USA, Inc.; 2017.

SOURCE:
Allergan

Power Up with Plant Protein

When it comes to getting energy from the food you eat, it’s no secret that protein packs a powerful punch. However, research shows certain plant-based proteins, like peanuts, may carry additional benefits.

According to a Harvard School of Public Health study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, substituting plant-based proteins like peanuts for animal proteins and low-quality carbohydrates can result in lowering diabetes risk by 7-21 percent. Because peanuts are known as a low glycemic index food due to their slow digestion that causes sugar to gradually be released into the bloodstream, they can have positive effects on blood sugar control.

Find more nutritional information and ways to include peanuts in your diet at gapeanuts.com.

Chicken Pad Thai

Servings: 4

  • 1 pound chicken breast
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce
  • 3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 medium zucchini, spiralized (about 1 cup)
  • 2 medium carrots, spiralized (about 1 cup)
  • 1 cup cooked pad thai stir-fry noodles
  • 1 cup bean sprouts
  • 1 cup thinly sliced cabbage
  • 1 lime, quartered
  • 1/4 cup unsalted peanuts, crushed
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  1. Season chicken with pepper, to taste. In large, nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, heat olive oil and cook chicken until fully cooked and juices are clear. Remove chicken from pan and allow to rest 5 minutes before slicing.
  2. To make sauce: In small bowl, whisk together honey, chili garlic sauce, rice wine vinegar, soy sauce, peanut butter and water.
  3. Add zucchini, carrots, rice noodles and chicken to pan; pour sauce over and toss to coat. Toss in bean sprouts and cabbage. Serve with lime wedge, crushed peanuts and cilantro.

Nutritional information per serving: 295 calories, 12 g total fat, 2 g saturated fat, 60 mg cholesterol, 792 mg sodium, 22 g carbohydrates, 4 g fiber, 9 g sugar, 27 g protein, 109% vitamin A, 46% vitamin C, 7% calcium, 10% iron.

Peanut Butter Banana Overnight Oats

Servings: 2

  • 1/4 cup powdered peanut butter
  • 3/4 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 2 teaspoons ground chia seeds
  • 1 1/2 cups unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup small banana, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon peanuts, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter
  1. In medium bowl, stir together powdered peanut butter, oats, chia seeds, coconut milk and vanilla extract.
  2. Divide evenly into mason jars or storage containers and refrigerate overnight.
  3. Before serving, add banana slices, chopped peanuts and peanut butter to each.

Nutritional information per serving: 280 calories, 12 g total fat, 4 g saturated fat, 135 mg sodium, 36 g carbohydrates, 7 g dietary fiber, 8 g sugar, 10 g protein, 8% vitamin A, 4% vitamin C, 35% calcium, 13% iron.

Baked Salmon with Peanut Butter Glaze

Servings: 4

  • 1 pound salmon
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 cup peanut butter
  • 2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce
  • 1/4 cup 100 percent orange juice
  1. Heat oven to 400° F and line baking sheet with aluminum foil. Place salmon on baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil and season with pepper, to taste. Bake salmon 15-20 minutes until cooked through.
  2. In small saucepot over medium-low heat, whisk together peanut butter, chili garlic sauce and orange juice, and cook until warm.
  3. To serve, pour peanut butter glaze over salmon.

Nutritional information per serving: 334 calories, 23 g total fat, 5 g saturated fat, 50 mg cholesterol, 173 mg sodium, 5 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, 3 g sugar, 27 g protein, 8% vitamin C, 4% calcium, 3% iron.

Vegetarian Nourish Bowl

Servings: 4

  • 1 cup large, diced butternut squash
  • 16 ounces Brussels sprouts, halved
  • 1 medium red onion, large diced
  • 1/2 can (8 ounces) reduced-sodium garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 head garlic (about 10 cloves), peeled
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 teaspoon Sriracha sauce
  • 1/4 cup peanut butter
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped peanuts
  1. Heat oven to 400° F and line rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. On prepared baking sheet, arrange butternut squash, Brussels sprouts, onion, garbanzo beans and garlic; toss vegetables in olive oil and season with pepper, to taste.
  2. Roast 30-40 minutes until slightly golden in color. Halfway through baking, shake vegetables or turn over to ensure even browning.
  3. To make dressing: Mix together lemon juice, water, Sriracha sauce and peanut butter.
  4. To serve, top quinoa with roasted veggies, crushed peanuts and drizzle of lemon-peanut butter sauce.

Nutritional information per serving: 323 calories, 14 g total fat, 2 g saturated fat, 308 mg sodium, 42 g carbohydrates, 11 g fiber, 5 g sugar, 13 g protein, 92% vitamin A, 197% vitamin C, 11% calcium, 28% iron. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Georgia Peanut Commission

7 Consejos para controlar la diabetes

Mantenerse saludable puede ser un desafío, en especial para las personas que viven con diabetes. Las personas suelen tener dificultad para encontrar un equilibrio de participar en hábitos saludables, como el ejercicio, comer bien e incluso mantener sus dientes y encías limpios. Del estrés a los cuidados personales, la vida puede tener altibajos cuando uno vive con diabetes.

Estos siete consejos de la Dra. Natalie Strand, ganadora de la temporada 17 de “The Amazing Race” que vive con diabetes, puede ayudarlo a mantenerse saludable y llevar una vida equilibrada mientras controla su diabetes.

Comuníquese con su equipo de atención. Asegúrese de conectarse con su endocrinólogo/a, enfermero/a, y nutricionista. Acuda a ellos con sus preguntas, ya que a menudo pueden ayudarle a implementar cambios sutiles para evitar cambiar completamente su estilo de vida y la rutina a causa de la diabetes.

Involúcrese. Organice un grupo local para recaudar fondos, desahogarse o simplemente estar cerca de gente que entiende su situación. Grupos como Diabetes Sisters, JDRF, TuDiabetes y BeyondType1 ofrecen formas de conectarse con otras personas que viven con diabetes en persona o en las redes sociales. Conectarse con la comunidad de la diabetes es una forma poderosa de ayudar a aliviar la carga de vivir con diabetes.

Siga haciendo lo que ama. El hecho de que tenga diabetes no significa que tenga que dejar de hacer lo que ama. Esfuércese en seguir con los deportes, viajes y otros pasatiempos, incluso si hay una curva de aprendizaje para adaptarse a la diabetes al principio.

Mantenga una buena salud bucal. Las personas que viven con diabetes son dos veces más propensas a desarrollar enfermedad de las encías, según los Centros para el Control de Enfermedades. La crema dental Colgate Total está aprobada por la FDA para ayudar a revertir y prevenir la gingivitis, una forma temprana de la enfermedad de las encías, en algunas personas.

Desarrolle una rutina. Encuentre una rutina que funcione y sea parte de ella. De esta manera, no tiene que tomar nuevas decisiones cada día. Cualquier cosa que pueda aliviar la carga mental de la diabetes puede ayudar. Por ejemplo, elija un tiempo cada año para sus visitas anuales: oftalmólogo, endocrinólogo, renovar recetas, etc. Elegir la misma época del año todos los años puede ayudar a asegurar que no olvide de cuidar de sí mismo.

Haga del autocuidado una prioridad. Puede ser difícil anteponer el cuidado diabético. Puede ser aburrido, agotador y también pasar a un segundo plano. Recuerde que una de las mejores cosas que puede hacer por sí mismo y por sus seres queridos es mantenerse saludable. Utilice a su familia como motivación para hacer ejercicio todos los días, comer alimentos que sean mejores para usted y mantener un peso saludable.

Maneje el estrés. La diabetes puede ser un gran factor de estrés. Sumado al trabajo, los niños y las relaciones, puede llegar a ser abrumador. Encuentre una herramienta fácil y eficaz para el alivio del estrés y utilícela a menudo. Incluso de 5 a 10 minutos diarios de meditación guiada pueden tener un gran impacto en el manejo del estrés.

Para obtener más información y maneras de llevar una vida equilibrada con la diabetes, visite OralHealthandDiabetes.com. (Family Features)

6 Drinks to Sip Your Way to Wellness

Stir up sippable, flavorful drinks and snacking soups for easy ways to add more wellness to your day. Start with robust flavors like turmeric, cayenne and ginger then pair with wholesome ingredients like pineapple, dandelion greens and cucumber to create delicious sips to help you awaken, stay energized or replenish.

Fill your glass (or mug) with a breakfast boost to jumpstart your morning, a smoky sipping broth for an afternoon pick-me-up or an evening elixir to help rebalance after a busy day.

Find more easy ways to add wellness to your day at McCormick.com or check out McCormick on Facebook and Pinterest.

Morning Jumpstart

  • Spiced Cucumber and Apple Morning Boost – Start the day right with this fresh, homemade drink. This invigorating wake-me-up blends clementine, cucumber and Granny Smith apple with ice, while a pinch of red pepper brings the zing.

  • Fizz ’n’ Fruit Energizer – Your morning can get a boost with this citrusy refresher, mixing sparkling clementine juice with muddled apple and cucumber, and a splash of cayenne-spiked simple syrup.

Afternoon Sip

  • Smoky Avocado and Mushroom Drinkable Soup – This satisfying, snackable soup combines fragrant smoky chipotle pepper with creamy avocado and fresh cucumbers. Top it off with chopped oyster mushrooms sauteed with herbs and pistachios.

Evening Elixir

  • Ginger, Turmeric and Beet Sipping Elixir – Rebalance at the end of the day with a tangy, spiced sipping elixir over ice. With ingredients like ginger, turmeric and apple cider vinegar, it’s loaded with nutritional goodness. Transform it into a tasty Old Fashioned cocktail with the addition of bourbon, orange liqueur, sugar and a maraschino cherry garnish.

Kickstart a Healthier Lifestyle

Consider a high-protein, low-carb and low-sugar option

This time of year, millions of Americans are making resolutions to lose weight. When it comes to adopting a healthy eating plan, it can seem like the options are endless. With new diet plans popping up seemingly every day, the process of choosing a plan that works for you and fits your lifestyle can be an intimidating one.

Many experts agree, however, that a diet high in protein and low in sugar and carbohydrates offers significant benefits. This was the foundation for the South Beach Diet, introduced 15 years ago by cardiologist Dr. Arthur Agatston. Since its introduction, it has helped millions of people successfully lose weight, while its books became best-sellers with more than 23 million copies sold in print.

Now in its second year as a structured weight-loss meal delivery program, South Beach introduced an enhanced three-phase approach designed to burn fat, transform metabolism and boost energy, including a 7-Day Body Reboot to help break the sugar habit and South Beach Complete Shakes. According to the company, users can expect to lose up to 9 pounds and 3 inches overall in their first two weeks on the program.

Over-consumption of sugar, which can lead to diabetes and heart disease, is one of the biggest problems in many Americans’ diets, according to Agatston.

“Sugar, be it simple sugar or from refined carbs, should be avoided,” Agatston said. “In fact, I would say fats aren’t making us gain weight, sugar is. It’s not about eliminating fats and carbs, it’s about the quality of the fats and carbs you’re eating.”

To help break the harmful sugar habit, foods on the South Beach Diet provide 1 percent of calories from added sugars – significantly lower than the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendation, which suggests that no more than 10 percent of calories come from added sugars.

So what’s the easiest way to live a high-protein, low-sugar, low-carb lifestyle? The answer could be a weight loss meal delivery program, like South Beach. For many, meal prep is equally as intimidating as sticking to a New Year’s resolution. The time required for food shopping and meal preparation often prevents a person from sticking to his or her healthy lifestyle. A weight-loss meal delivery plan allows one to make smarter meal choices and eliminates nearly all prep time. According to South Beach, its program delivers fully prepared, delicious meals that make sticking to a healthy lifestyle simpler and more convenient.

For added convenience, the South Beach Diet Tracker App provides access to meal plans and recipes as well as support and counseling from trained weight-loss coaches and registered dietitians.

Find more tips and tools to begin the weight loss journey at SouthBeachDiet.com. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
South Beach Diet

Dermatologist Debunks Top 5 Skincare Misconceptions

Picture - Teen Influential - Health & Wellness - Top 5 Myths

Figuring out what’s best for your skin can feel like solving a difficult mystery – everyone’s condition is unique, there are countless treatment options and people will do almost anything for a clear complexion.

“When it comes to your skin, there are many elements to consider,” says Dr. David Lortscher, board-certified dermatologist, CEO and founder of Curology. “Clogged pores, acne and other common issues can be a result of age, genetics, lifestyle and environmental factors. I often hear about common misconceptions that cause otherwise well-meaning people to make mistakes that trigger larger skincare problems.”

To help people better understand skincare and take control of their daily regimen, Dr. Lortscher shares the top misconceptions about skincare and acne.

Misconception: Exercise and sweat can cause acne.

Fact: Sweating while exercising doesn’t cause acne. The eccrine glands produce sweat and the sebaceous glands produce oil – so revving up the sweat glands doesn’t actually turn on the oil glands involved in acne breakouts. The truth is sweating and humidity can aggravate breakouts by giving the bacteria on the skin a better environment to grow.

Cleansing is key post-workout, but keep in mind vigorously cleansing your skin can also be a source of friction that aggravates acne. The best strategy is to splash comfortable-temperature water on your face and neck, then pat dry gently.

Misconception: Chocolate and greasy foods cause acne.

Fact: Many people have heard that chocolate and junk food are the worst foods for your skin, but modern science hasn’t found a direct link between acne and oily foods.

Diets are like acne treatments: highly individual. That’s not to say your eating habits can’t affect your skin. Eating simple carbs and sugar raises your blood sugar levels, causing your body to produce excess insulin, in turn stimulating oil production and leading to more inflammation and increased acne severity.

Misconception: DIY skincare and home remedies are good for your skin.

Fact: The DIY craze has extended to skincare routines, giving people ample ways to create their own remedies at home. However, it’s wise to be careful about the ingredients applied to your skin.

Some people try baking soda as a cost-effective scrub or mask. Baking soda is pH 9 and the pH of the skin is 4.5-5 or so. Therefore, scrubbing your face with a baking soda paste can be harsh and disturb your skin’s natural barrier, leading to red, raw and sensitive skin and leaving it susceptible to breakout.

Others suggest lemon juice as a home remedy for acne but it can cause significant dryness, redness and irritation. Lemon juice may have an exfoliating effect on the most superficial dead skin cells, but there are better ways to treat your acne.

If you’re fed up with DIY remedies and over-the-counter products just haven’t worked for you, you have options. Try custom prescription skincare like Curology, a service that gets you expert dermatology care from the comfort of your home. Just take a few photos and a skin quiz to get a prescription formula customized to your individual needs.

Misconception: You can make your pores smaller.

Fact: Most people want smaller pores, but in reality, you can’t change the size or force them “open” or “closed.”

Pore size is genetic; you can’t shrink them or make pores go away. To keep large pores from worsening, treat acne breakouts, don’t pick and use sun protection. Sun exposure breaks down collagen, which is the support structure surrounding the pores, so pores do appear larger as you age.

Misconception: You only need to wear sunscreen on sunny days.

Fact: It doesn’t matter if it’s sunny or cloudy; if you plan to spend time outdoors, wear sunscreen daily. It is estimated that damage caused by ultraviolet rays from the sun is responsible for up to 80 percent of skin aging.

SPF is a measure of a sunscreen’s ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. Most sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher do an excellent job of protecting against UVB. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. (BPT)

Baby Greens Kicks Off the New Year with a 28-Day Challenge and New Menu Items

Challenge Participants Entered to Win One Year of Free Baby Greens!

 WHAT:

Baby Greens, the drive-thru restaurant offering salads and wraps, is excited to kick off the new year with its annual 28-Day Challenge, a 28-day healthy living challenge designed to encourage healthier habits for Austinites and help them start fresh in 2018.

The 28-Day Challenge will officially begin on Wednesday, January 10, and will consist of a daily dose of healthy tips, recipes, workout routines, nutrition tidbits, menu specials, and more that will be shared through the restaurant’s Instagram account. Special activities will be hosted by Baby Greens throughout the month, including classes by Black Swan Yoga, Todd Pilates & Barre, and more. The challenge will feature special perks, like exclusive discounts to Crux Climbing Center, Sustainable Food Center’s 6-part series Fundamentals of Healthy Home Cooking, and more. 

“Baby Greens is so excited to kick off the 28-Day Challenge! We want to make it fun for Austinites to do at least one thing every day to be a little bit healthier,” says Sharon Mays, owner and founder of Baby Greens. “Baby Greens created this challenge to encourage people to try new activities with us. We’ll have beginners classes for yoga, pilates, boot camp, and more—it’s the perfect opportunity to start the year off right!”

Along with the challenge, Baby Greens is excited to introduce new menu additions. The new offerings will make it easy for anyone with healthy New Year’s resolutions or diets to stay on track. New items include a Whole 30 salad (romaine lettuce, kale, purple cabbage, carrots, tomatoes, avocado, sugar snap peas, and hemp seeds with roasted onion and garlic vinaigrette—vegan and Whole 30 compliant), gluten-free peanut butter cookies, blueberry lemonade, and a new collard greens offering for wraps allowing customers to have their wrap rolled up in collard greens instead of a flour tortilla.

Austinites are encouraged to participate in the challenge and share their photos and experience related to the day’s focus using the hashtag #28daysofbabygreens.

At the end of the challenge, a prize will be awarded to a lucky winner who participates in the 28-Day Challenge. Those who post weekly (or more), will be entered to win a Grand Prize Package at the end of the 28-Day Challenge, which will include a year of free Baby Greens (restrictions apply).

Baby Greens restaurant is located at 1508 W. Anderson Lane. The restaurant is open Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The full menu and additional information can be found at eatbabygreens.com. 

WHEN:

Challenge begins: Wednesday, January 10 

WHERE:

28-Day Challenge: Baby Greens’ Instagram | @eatbabygreens | #eatbabygreens #28daysofbabygreens              

Start the Year Strong with this High-Performance Vegetable

Chasing a place on the podium isn’t possible without the proper fuel for your body. Whether you’re going for the gold or just passing the pigskin in honor of the big game, athletes and amateurs alike need the right combination of nutrients to take on their training, and sports nutritionists across the nation are recommending one vegetable in particular to get them there – potatoes! Here’s why:

  • Carbohydrate – Potatoes are a nutrient-dense vegetable with 26 grams of quality carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are important for optimal physical and mental performance as the primary fuel for your brain and a key source of energy for muscles. And, because your body’s own stores of carbohydrates are limited and may be depleted – even in a single session of intense and/or prolonged exercise – it’s important to replenish them.
  • Potassium – Did you know a medium-sized potato with the skin has more potassium than a medium-sized banana? A medium (5.2 ounce) skin-on potato contains 620 mg of potassium, an important electrolyte that aids in muscle, cardiovascular and nervous system function. The 2015 Dietary Guidelines mention potassium as an under-consumed nutrient of concern, and recommend consuming foods with high levels of potassium such as white potatoes.
  • Energy – Potatoes are more energy-packed than any other popular vegetable. Adequate energy intake supports optimal body functions and it’s critical to take in the appropriate number of calories to match the demands of the day, especially while training.

Partial to pasta or rice? With as much – if not more – of several essential vitamins and minerals found in spaghetti, brown rice or whole wheat bread, potatoes are a smart addition to your other favorite performance foods (compared on a per-serving basis). What’s more, a medium Russet potato with the skin has more vitamin C and potassium than a medium sweet potato.

There is a medal-worthy potato option to fit your tastes (and schedule) no matter what sport is your specialty. Leslie Bonci, registered dietitian and nutrition consultant for the Kansas City Chiefs and the WNBA, says, “I love potatoes for their versatility, affordability and applicability to all types of culinary options. The carbohydrate, fiber and potassium make them a great choice for workouts and offer a change of pace and taste from other sports-focused foods.” She created a recipe for portable and crunchy On-the-Go Potatoes for a quick savory snack for mid-hike or mid-bike that’s ready in just about 30 minutes. Gearing up for a busy week? Make a batch of On-the-Go Potatoes on Sunday and freeze them. Defrost throughout the week by leaving in the refrigerator overnight, and then simply re-heat in the toaster oven (or enjoy cold). (BPT)

On-the-Go Potatoes

Yield: 8 servings (about 5 potatoes per serving)

Ingredients:

24 oz. petite yellow potatoes (about 40 petite potatoes)

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 cup panko crumbs

1/4 cup tuxedo sesame seeds

2 teaspoons Chinese 5-Spice seasoning mix

Directions:

Put potatoes in a bowl and toss with the olive oil and soy sauce. Mix to coat well.

In a separate bowl, combine panko bread crumbs, sesame seeds and 5-spice seasoning and mix well.

In small batches, put the potatoes in the bread crumb mixture and roll around to coat well.

Transfer to a cookie sheet. Bake at 450 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes, until cooked through.

Nutrition

Per serving (8 servings; about 5 potatoes per serving): Calories 174, Fat: 5.7 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 257 mg, Carbohydrates: 26.8 g, Fiber: 2.5 g, Potassium: 485 mg, Protein: 4.3 g, Vitamin C: 7 mg.

Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Position of the Academy for Nutrition and Dietetics, American College of Sports Medicine and the Dietitians of Canada. Med Sci Sports Excerc. 2015; 48:543-568.

Burke LM, Hawley JA, Wong SH, Jeukendrup AE. Carbohydrates for training and competition. J Sports Sci. 2011; 29(Suppl 1): S17-27.

Potassium: Food Sources Ranked by Amounts of Potassium and Energy per Standard Food Portions and per 100 Grams of Foods. Available at: http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-10/.

Gelibter A, et al. Satiety following intake of potatoes and other carbohydrate test meals. Ann Nutr Metab. 2013;62:37-43.

9 USDA standard reference 28, based on Reference Amounts Customarily Consumed (RACC).