Shake Up Your Dinner Routine

If you find yourself stuck in a rut with the same recipes, remember a little change can add a lot of flavor. By simply using fresh pork in dishes that usually consist of chicken or beef, there are countless ways to switch up your dinner routine.

Whether grilled, roasted, slow-cooked or sautéed, Smithfield Fresh Pork is available in a wide variety of cuts as well as pre-marinated flavors, making it versatile and convenient for any night of the week. Try out these recipes for Smoked Bacon Pork Alfredo and Grilled Pork Loin Fajitas to shake up your next meal.

Find more recipe ideas at Smithfield.com/ShakeItUp.

Smoked Bacon Pork Alfredo

Prep time: 8 minutes

Cook time: 22 minutes

Servings: 6-8

  • 1          Smithfield Applewood Smoked Bacon Marinated Fresh Pork Loin Filet
  • 3          tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1          pound penne pasta
  • 1          package (8 ounces) sliced mushrooms
  • salt, to taste
  • 2          jars (15 ounces each) Alfredo sauce
  • pepper, to taste
  • 1/4       cup finely chopped green onion (optional)
  • grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
  1. Cut pork loin into 1/2-inch thick slices then into 1/4-inch wide strips. In large skillet over medium-high heat, heat 1 tablespoon oil. Stir-fry half the pork loin 7-8 minutes until well browned. Set aside on separate plate and repeat with 1 tablespoon oil and remaining pork.
  2. Cook pasta according to package directions.
  3. In skillet over medium-high heat, heat remaining oil; add mushrooms and sprinkle with salt, to taste. Cook 3 minutes, or until tender, stirring occasionally.
  4. Drain pasta and return to pot; stir in pork, mushrooms and Alfredo sauce. Stir over medium heat about 4 minutes until heated through. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Sprinkle with green onions and Parmesan cheese, if desired.

Grilled Pork Loin Fajitas

Prep time: 20 minutes, plus 30 minutes marinade time

Cook time: 30 minutes

Servings: 4-6

  • 1          Smithfield Prime Boneless Fresh Pork Loin, cut into 1-inch thick steaks
  • 1 1/2    cups water, divided
  • 1          cup soy sauce
  • 1          can (6 ounces) pineapple juice
  • 6          cloves garlic
  • 1/4       cup white wine
  • 1          teaspoon salt
  • 1          cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 2          large onions, cut into 1/2-inch wide strips
  • 1          tablespoon corn oil
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • 12        tortillas
  • guacamole (optional)
  • sour cream (optional)
  • pico de gallo (optional)
  • shredded cheese (optional)
  1. Using meat mallet, pound pork steaks until 1/2-inch thick; place in 1-gallon re-sealable plastic bag. Pour 1 cup water, soy sauce and pineapple juice over pork; seal bag and lay flat in refrigerator 30 minutes, turning occasionally.
  2. In blender, pulse garlic, white wine and salt until thoroughly blended. Whisk butter and slowly incorporate garlic and wine mixture. Reserve at room temperature.
  3. In large skillet over high heat, saute onions in corn oil 2 minutes until they turn deep brown. Add remaining water to skillet and lower heat to medium-low. Cook and stir, scraping bits from bottom of pan, 15 minutes until water has evaporated and onions are caramelized. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Heat grill to 300 F for indirect cooking. Lightly grease grates.
  5. Remove pork from marinade and place on grill over indirect heat 4-6 minutes per side, until internal temperature reaches 145 F. Remove pork and brush garlic butter on both sides. Let stand 5 minutes; slice into 3-inch long, thin strips.
  6. While grill is hot, grill tortillas individually. Wrap four tortillas at a time in aluminum foil with a little garlic butter.
  7. In skillet, reheat caramelized onions and serve with fajitas. Top with guacamole, sour cream, pico de gallo and shredded cheese, if desired. (Family Features)

SOURCE:
Smithfield

New Effort Aims to Bolster Music Venues

As you nod along to a catchy tune over dinner or drinks with friends, you might not even think about the live music you’re enjoying. For many people, live music is simply part of the ambiance of their local bars or restaurants. For others, it may be the main draw. Either way, people often don’t give much thought to the price of that entertainment.

For small business owners, however, paying for a license for that music can be a major worry. While playing live music in a venue without a license is copyright infringement, creating potential liability for lawsuits seeking large amounts of money, it is often impossible for business owners to figure out which licenses to buy, for what and from whom. Despite the explosive growth in access to information of all kinds online, there is still not a single comprehensive and actionable database of music copyright ownership and licensing that exists today.

If a person wants to buy licenses for copyrighted music, they currently must sift through a sparse patchwork of incomplete databases – covering only some copyrighted works, like those maintained by the performing rights organizations (PROs) that license song performances. Those databases are often unhelpful and usually state that they can’t be relied on to be accurate or up-to-date. Business owners wanting to offer music to their customers are often not equipped with the tools necessary to make rational decisions based on opaque data.

This leaves business owners either guessing or forced to buy all of the licenses. Increasingly, venues like restaurants, taverns, wineries and hotels are walking away from hosting live musicians altogether. In fact, a 2016 industry survey by WineAmerica estimated as many as 32 percent of wineries throughout the United States have either canceled or are considering canceling their live music programs. This can put venue owners in a no-win position and leave them denying opportunities for new and upcoming artists to do what they love and discover new audiences.

Bipartisan legislation introduced by Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI) may provide a solution to this problem. The Transparency in Music Licensing and Ownership Act would help establish a neutral, searchable, digital database of historical and current copyright ownership and licensing information, free-of-charge.

“Beverage licensees have been clear that their focus is on bringing transparency to the music licensing process and already support songwriters by collectively paying millions of dollars in licensing fees to PROs,” said John Bodnovich, executive director of the American Beverage Licensees trade association. “This is a bipartisan issue, affecting hospitality businesses in every town, city and state across America, and this bill is a sensible step toward a more transparent system.”

The proposed legislation is a step toward creating an open and accessible music licensing system, ensuring that venues can safely continue to provide live music for their patrons.

“Transparency is the only way for wineries to make sound business decisions when it comes to music,” said Tara Good, vice president of WineAmerica. “Music and live music performances play a huge part in promoting wine tourism and creating a memorable and unique experience.”

With more transparency and access to music ownership and licensing information, venue owners can buy the right licensing with confidence and you can keep enjoying live music. To support live music at local venues, call your members of Congress and urge them to support H.R.3350 – Transparency in Music Licensing and Ownership Act. (Family Features)